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Global Forum 2011

Stockholm, Sweden | August 21-23, 2011

Global Forum 2011 > Agenda

Global Forum Agenda

Sunday, August 21, 2011

10:30

Registration opens

12:30 – 14:00  

Informal lunch at Hotel Clarion Sign

14:00 – 15:30 

Opening Remarks (Room: Banquet Hall)

Douglas Rutzen, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

Ambassador Maria Leissner Ambassador-at-Large for Democracy, Sweden

Welcome messages (video)

Plenary Discussion - Global Trends and Critical Issues Confronting Civil Society

Facilitators:
Nilda Bullain, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary

15:30 – 16:00   

Coffee break

16:00 – 17:30

Breakout Sessions #1

Backlash against Civil Society (Room: B1)
The regulatory backlash against civil society continues.  The past year has witnessed a new wave of constraining legislation, either proposed or enacted, in countries throughout the world.  While the problem is familiar, effective solutions remain elusive.  First, participants will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the second edition of the Defending Civil Society report, prepared by the World Movement for Democracy and ICNL.  Second, participants will work in small groups to formulate responsive reform strategies to particular reform challenges.

Facilitators:
1. Ryota Jonen, World Movement for Democracy, USA
2. David Moore, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Borithy Lun, Cooperation Committee for Cambodia, Cambodia
2. Livingstone Sewanyana, Foundation for Human Rights Initiative, Uganda
3. Irene Petras, Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights, Zimbabwe
4.Orazio Bellettini, Grupo FARO, Ecuador

Enabling Civil Society to Support Democratic Transitions (Room: B2)
A country transitioning to more democratic rule needs to develop the legal and policy infrastructure to promote civil society's engagement. This infrastructure may include a framework law establishing enabling conditions for civil society organizations (CSOs), as well as laws affecting the sustainability of CSOs and facilitating cooperation between CSOs and government. This session will consider lessons learned regarding the development of a legal enabling environment in countries that have transitioned towards democracy. It will consider how reform of the legal framework can affect engagement by civil society, as well as timing and sequencing of law reform initiatives.

Panelists:
1. Nilda Bullain, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary
2. Dana Sofi, Kurdistan Parliament, Iraq
3. Goran Buldioski, Think Tank Fund, Open Society Foundations, Hungary
4. Emmanuel Saffa Abdulai, Society for Democratic Initiatives, Sierra Leone

Facilitator:
Dima Jweihan, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, LLC, Jordan Affiliate Office

Social Enterprise (Room: B3)
The importance of "social enterprise" – especially in light of the global economic downturn – is increasingly clear. But questions abound: How do you define social enterprise? What challenges do these organizations face? Is a new legal form required for social enterprise? Using a talk-show format, this knowledge-sharing session will address these and other questions from a range of country perspectives.

Panelists:
1. Iman Bibars, Ashoka, Egypt
2. Betsy Buchalter Adler, Adler & Colvin, USA
3. Lindsay Driscoll, Bates Wells and Braithwaite, United Kingdom
4. Adriana Ruiz-Restrepo, RRA (Public Law + Social Innovation), Colombia

Facilitator:
Dragan Golubovic, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary

Countering Counterterrorism Rhetoric: Addressing Anti-Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing (Room: C12)
Governments around the world are increasingly justifying restrictions on civic space as necessary to prevent money laundering and terrorist financing. In this interactive session, participants will develop strategies and plans for responding to terrorism-based restrictions on civic space. Participants will also learn about international initiatives such as the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and the United Nations Counterterrorism Executive Directorate (CTED), as well as the most common restrictions at national levels. The session will consider how these initiatives and limitations may impact CSOs' work at home and abroad and will provide practical tools to effectively counter them.

Facilitators: 
1. Ben Evans, Charity Commission for England and Wales, United Kingdom
2. Mark Sidel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
3. Kareem Elbayar, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

19:00 

Welcome dinner in Hotel Clarion Sign (Room Banquet Hall)

 

Monday, August 22, 2011

09:00 – 10:30

Breakout Sessions #2

How to Analyze Legislation Affecting Civil Society (Room: B1)
Whether addressing a draft law or seeking to improve an existing law, a sound analysis of the regulatory strengths and weaknesses of the law provides a crucial starting point. In this skill-building session, we will work in small groups to review and analyze a draft law against the background of international law and good regulatory practice. Participants will work together to identify problematic provisions and prioritize key issues. Finally, we will consider how to prepare the written analysis of the draft law in a persuasive, effective way.

Facilitator:
David Moore, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

Strengthening Cooperation Between Government and CSOs (Room: B2)
Governments and CSOs increasingly search for ways to cooperate and institutionalize their partnership. But what factors make this cooperation successful and real? At this session, participants will first assess the level of cooperation in their own countries. Participants will then analyze the factors that influence success and discuss ways to overcome challenges in developing and implementing various cooperation mechanisms.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. John  Batten, Poverty Eradication Network, Kenya
2. Anatolie Beleac, FHI 360, Moldova
3. Ivana Cirkovic, Government Office for Cooperation with Civil Society, Serbia
4. Dima Jweihan, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Jordan
5. Nguyen Thi Bich Diep, Justice Initiatives Facilitation Fund, Vietnam
6. Adriana Ruiz-Restrepo, RRA (Public Law + Social Innovation) , Colombia

Facilitator:
Nilda Bullain, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary

Engaging Media and Journalists in Advocacy for CSO Law Reform (Room: B3)
Whether CSOs are seeking reform of the laws governing their activities, or opposing new restrictions, effective engagement of the media is crucial to a successful advocacy campaign. The session will focus on how CSOs can craft an effective message that will engage media and journalists on CSO legal issues. Participants will hear from a panel featuring expert perspectives on how CSO law reformers can develop a message to engage the media (including new media). Participants will also engage in interactive exercise where they will practice how to craft a media friendly message.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Randa Fouad, Arab Media Forum for Environment and Development, Egypt
2. Kamel Ben Younes, Forum Averroes Maghreb, Tunisia
3. Mina Mouris, the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information, Egypt
4. Borithy Lun, Cooperation Committee for Cambodia (TBC)

Facilitator:
Catherine Shea, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

Survival Techniques for CSOs in Severely Restrictive Environments (Room: C12)
This session will provide a safe space for donors, civil society representatives, and diplomats to discuss ways to continue activities in politically restrictive environments.  The session will be held under “Chatham House” rules.  Participants will work in groups to develop survival tactics under the following topics: legal existence; meetings, public assemblies, and protests; access to funding; security; and activities.  They will explore options to maintain operations in the face of imposed restrictions, as well as measures that can be taken in advance to mitigate harm when severe limitations appear imminent. 

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Orazio Bellettini, Grupo FARO, Ecuador
2. Hassan Sheikhahmed, East and Horn of Africa HRDs Project, Uganda
3. Natalia Bourjaily, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA
4. Bhekinkosi Moyo, Trust Africa, Senegal

Facilitator:
Feliciano Reyna, Sinergia-Accion Solidaria, Venezuela

Idea Exchange for CSO Lawyers (Room: C3)
Many of the issues facing lawyers who work with CSO clients, whether as legal staff or outside counsel, transcend national boundaries. How can CSO lawyers gain the knowledge and expertise that they need? What can they learn from each other, and how might they stay connected with their peers both within their own countries and across borders? What sort of relationship should CSO lawyers have with the governmental agencies that regulate CSOs? What practical challenges and opportunities arise when the client is a CSO rather than a business, governmental agency, or individual? What is the role of CSO lawyers in developing policies that affect CSOs? This session will be a conversation among peers on the challenges in their work and potential solutions.

Facilitators:
1. Betsy Buchalter Adler, Adler & Colvin, USA
2. Arthur Drache, Drache Aptowitzwe LLP, Canada
3. Lindsay Driscoll, Bates Wells and Braithwaite, United Kingdom
4. Janne Gallagher, Council on Foundations, USA

10:30 – 11:00   

Coffee break

11:00 – 12:30

Breakout Sessions #3

Achieving Accountability through Public and Self-Regulation Initiatives (Room: B1)
The last twenty years have seen great changes in laws and regulations relating to CSOs, as governments respond to political changes, an evolving CSO sector, international rules on terrorist financing, and greater demands for accountability and transparency. This session will look at some of the main trends in governmental and civil society responses, and highlight models adopted by governments and civil society to ensure accountability. What does work? What type of government models can help support accountable functioning of the sector? What does it take to implement self-regulation models in order to achieve desired results? Where is the balance?

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Ralitsa Velichkova, Bulgarian Center for Not-For-Profit Law, Bulgaria
2. Malik Babur Javed, Pakistan Centre for Philanthropy, Pakistan
3. Sixto Donato Macasaet, Caucus of Development NGO Networks, the Philippines
4. Sheila Nordon, Irish Charities Tax Research, Ireland
5. Nigel Tarling, Charity Commission for England and Wales, United Kingdom
6. Alari Rammo, Network of Estonian Nonprofit Organizations, Estonia

Facilitator:
Ben Evans, Charity Commission for England and Wales, United Kingdom

How to Select CSO Representatives (Room: B2)
How to select the CSO representatives who will serve on cross-sector bodies (e.g., Ministry led-working groups, government councils)? How to ensure that CSO participation leads to practical results and is not just to "check the box"? The CSO selection process can be challenging, especially in countries where there are no developed CSO networks. The legitimacy of CSO nominees may be questioned, especially if there are no clear mechanisms for the selection process. Participants in this session will hear from counterparts on criteria and mechanisms they have considered that lead to a good selection process and, ultimately, an effective participatory process.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Igor Vidacak, Government Office for Cooperation with CSOs, Croatia
2. Maria Vanessa Rivadeneyra Navarro, Servicio de Administracion Tributaria, Mexico
3. Nokatbek Idrisov, International Center for Not-For-Profit Law, Kyrgyzstan
4. Janah Ncube, Centre for Citizens' Participation on the African Union, Kenya

Facilitator:
Luben Panov, Bulgarian Center for Not-For-Profit Law, Bulgaria

Facilitating Cross-Border Philanthropy (Room: B3)
In an increasingly interconnected world, the legal barriers to cross-border philanthropy remain high. Indeed, in many countries and regions, cross-border philanthropy has become more difficult, due to complex procedural requirements affecting donors, discriminatory tax treatment of donations, counter-terrorism measures, and impediments narrowing the pool of eligible recipients, just to name a few constraints. This knowledge-sharing session will examine the kinds of legal barriers impeding cross-border philanthropy (and in many cases, domestic philanthropy as well); and consider successful strategies used to address the barriers to cross-border philanthropy, including the Global Leadership Philanthropy Initiative.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Filiz Bikmen, Sabanci Foundation, Turkey
2. Noshir Dadrawala, Centre for Advancement of Philanthropy, India
3. Ludwig Forrest, King Badouin Foundation, Belgium
4. Janne Gallagher, Council on Foundations, USA
5. Barbara Ibrahim, John D. Gerhart Center for Philanthropy and Civic Engagement, American University in Cairo, Egypt
6. Atallah Kuttab, SAANED for Philanthropy Advisory in the Arab Region, Jordan
7. Hanna Surmatz, European Foundation Centre, Belgium

Facilitator:
Gerry Salole, European Foundation Centre, Belgium

Building an Effective CSO Coalition (Room: C12)
CSOs in any country are extremely diverse and often have divergent interests. However, CSOs often are able to overcome differences and come together to support a common cause – and what else is more common to all CSOs than the laws that regulate them? Yet, in many countries CSOs leading law reform efforts struggle to build effective coalitions with their peers. Through an interactive exercise participants will look at the key components of forming an effective CSO coalition which can further CSO law reform efforts.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. George Zarubin, Eurasia Partnership Foundation, Georgia
2. Alicia Arias, Grupo Faro, Ecuador
3. Tina Divjak, CNVOS Slovenia
4. Hoshyar Malo, Kurdish Human Rights Watch, Iraq
5. Lia van Broekhoven, CORDAID, Netherlands

Facilitator:
Amy Bartlett, Open Forum for CSO Development Effectiveness, Belgium

Social Media 101 (part 1) (Room: C3)
Social Media has become an important tool for CSO activists, and many are eager to learn how to use new media to carry out their work more effectively. This is the first of a two-part training covering three hours in total that will introduce key tools -- Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube -- to participants interested in learning about the use of new media. It will focus on building participant skills in establishing an effective and distinct social media presence, and in engaging and motivating supporters. Participants should bring their laptops and be prepared to practice the techniques presented during the session.

Please Note: This session has two components. If you register for Social Media 101 (part 1), you should also register for Social Media 101 (part 2).

Trainer:
Sherif Mansour, Freedom House, USA

12:30 – 14:00   

Lunch

14:00 – 15:30

Breakout Sessions #4

Building a Strategic Framework for Government Funding to CSOs (Room: B1)
Funding is a key element of strengthening partnership with and supporting the growth of CSOs. Government funding is an important domestic funding source for the sector, but it raises many issues: a lack of resources, inadequate distribution mechanisms, low capacity of the sector to utilize it, and many others. In this session participants will engage in building a strategic framework for government funding of CSOs, and hear about the pros and cons of different models and mechanisms developed by peers who have direct experience in this field.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Ireri Ablanedo National Institute of Social Development, Mexico
2. Igor Vidacak, Government Office for Cooperation with CSOs, Croatia
3. Elizabeth Warner, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Kazakhstan
4. Filip Vagac, Government Plenipotentiary for Civil Society, Slovakia

Facilitator:
Nilda Bullain, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary

The Art and Science of Advocacy (Room: B2)
You have an opportunity to influence the preparation of amendments to an existing law governing civil society. Your job is to lead a team of CSOs to secure backing of draft amendments prepared by your legal team, to initiate a coordinated advocacy strategy to ensure support in the general public, the CSO sector, Government, and eventually Parliament. You have scheduled a meeting among CSOs to think through the plans for the campaign, while also building support among them for the campaign and for the amendments your team has drafted. How will you ensure general CSO support? In considering the advocacy campaign, who are the targets, and how will you most effectively make your points? What messages resonate, and what "messengers" should convey these points to the target(s)? How and when should you employ media and social media, mass meetings, other vehicles for conveying a cohesive message that reaches its various targets? What will be the timeline, given that Parliament will be in session only about 9 more months? In this session, officials and CSOs will share tips on advocacy techniques that are (and aren't) effective. Participants will then have a chance to design the campaign, in groups focused on individual elements.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Jeff Thindwa, World Bank
2. John Batten, Poverty Eradication Network, Kenya
3. Ala Talabani, Council of Representatives, Iraq 3. Ala Talabani, Council of Representatives, Iraq
4. Maria Vanessa Rivadeneyra Navarro, Servicio de Administracion Tributaria, Mexico

Facilitator:
Stephan Klingelhofer, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

Aid Effectiveness (Room: B3)
In the wake of the 2005 Paris Declaration and the 2008 Accra Agenda for Action (AAA), "aid effectiveness", along with the corresponding definitions, concepts and processes that it has triggered, has become a critical issue for donors, governments and CSOs alike. However, the aid effectiveness principles can be misused at the national level to provide cover for governments seeking to restrict basic freedoms of association and expression and to extend their control over independent civil society. This session will seek to answer critical questions, such as the purpose of the Paris Declaration and the AAA; the definition and intent of concepts such as "country ownership"; and the role that civil society can play as part of an inclusive and participatory process in planning and achieving a country's development goals.

Presenters:
1. Emmanuel Saffa Abdulai, Society for Democratic Initiatives, Sierra Leone
2. Netsanet Belay, CIVICUS, South Africa
3. Jacqueline Wood, Canadian International Development Agency, Canada

Resource persons:
1. Dana Sofi, Kurdistan Parliament, Iraq
2. Angelo Baglio, European Commission
3. Eric Picard, United States Agency for International Development, USA

Facilitator:
Charlotta Norrby, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency

Freedom of Assembly (Room: C12)
Recent events in Tunisia, Egypt and the Middle East more broadly have demonstrated the transformational power of public protest and the freedom of assembly. At the same time, events in other countries, from Azerbaijan to Uganda, have reminded us of the formidable constraints hindering the freedom of assembly. This knowledge-sharing session will examine the key legal challenges impeding free assembly; the key principles protecting free assembly; and key resources available regarding the international legal framework for public protest and public assemblies.

Speakers:
1. Inger Hoeedt-Rasmussen and Dirk Voorhoof, Legal Human Academy, Belgium
2. Kristen McGeeney and David Moore, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA 

Facilitator:
Arthur Larok, National NGO Forum, Uganda

Social Media 101 (part 2) (Room: C3)
Social Media has become an important tool for CSO activists, and many are eager to learn how to use new media to carry out their work more effectively. This is the second of a two-part, three-hour training session, which will introduce key tools -- Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube -- to participants interested in learning about the use of new media. It will focus on building participant skills in establishing an effective and distinct social media presence, and in engaging and motivating supporters. Participants should bring their laptops and be prepared to practice the techniques presented during the session. Participants must register for both Part 1 and Part 2 of this training.

Please Note: This session has two components.  If you register for Social Media 101 (part 2), you should also register for Social Media 101 (part 1).

Trainer:
Sherif Mansour, Freedom House, USA

15:30 – 16:00   

Coffee break

16:00 – 17:30  

Meet at the Civil Society Law Agora (Room: Banquet Hall)
The Agora (Greek: Άγορά, Agorá) was an open "place of assembly" in ancient Greek city-states, which served a variety of community functions; individuals could assemble, listen and discuss. At the Civil Society Law Agora, participants will have an opportunity to organize their own discussions on topics and regions of interest.

 

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

09:00 – 10:30

Breakout Sessions #5

Promoting Constructive Engagement with the Diplomatic Community and International Organizations (Room: B1)
The international community is increasingly interested in issues of civil society law.  But different organizations have different perspectives on these issues.  Diplomats and members of international organizations will discuss their perspectives.  They will also provide practical suggestions on ways in which civil society can enhance its engagement with the international community around civil society legal issues.

Panelists:
1. Ines Le Minter, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Canada
2. Jeff Thindwa, World Bank
3. Tomicah Tillemann, Department of State, USA
4. Bharati Sadasivam, United Nations Development Programme

Facilitator:
Tomas Brundin, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Sweden

We’ve Got a New Law Governing CSOs… Now What? (Room: B2)
Enacting a law governing CSOs, even progressive enabling legislation, is only a first step. For the law to bring real reform, fair and effective implementation is required. The process of developing regulations and tools for compliance should be inclusive, enabling CSOs that are affected by the law and officials tasked with implementing it to work together in identifying the issues and finding mutually acceptable solutions of problems. This session will provide a model of this participatory design process.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Anatolie Beleac, FHI 360, Moldova
2. Jorge Estrella Castillo, Servicio de Administracion Tributria, Mexico
3. Leticia Jáuregui Casanueva, Crea Comunidades de Emprendedores Sociales, A.C., Mexico
4. Edmond Tubanambazi, Ministry of Public Service and Labour, Rwanda
5. Ricardo Wyngaard, Ricardo Wyngaard Attorneys, South Africa

Facilitators:
Stephan Klingelhofer and Jocelyn Nieva, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

The “Arab Spring” and the Future of Civil Society in the Middle East and North Africa (Room: B3)
The world's attention has been captured by the historic events that have unfolded in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) this year. The overthrow of the dictatorial regimes in Tunisia and in Egypt has been echoed by demands for increased political rights and economic opportunities across MENA. In a region where civil and political rights have long been restricted, youth protest movements have sparked new hope for democratic reform and the removal of restrictions on the rights of association, assembly, and other fundamental freedoms. In this interactive discussion, conference participants will have a chance to speak directly with key civil society leaders and government officials from across the region. Speakers will focus on the strategies that have been used by civil society leaders to claw open civic space and will consider the prospects for more lasting changes to the legal and regulatory environment for civil society in MENA countries.

Panelists:
1. Ziad Abdel Samad, Arab NGO Network for Development, Lebanon (TBC)
2. Iman Bibars, Ashoka, Egypt
3. Jamal Jawahiri, Iraqi Al-Amal Association, Iraq
4. Kamel Ben Younes, Forum Averroes Maghreb, Tunisia

Facilitator:
Kareem Elbayar, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

The Future of European Union Development Funding (Room: C12)
Currently the European Union (EU) is developing its Multiannual Financial Framework for 2014-2020, which also includes the budget allocation for development aid from the EU.  What role is foreseen for civil society actors in the future of European aid? What amounts, instruments and modalities will be available for CSOs in partner countries to access EU funding?  And what can you do to have a say in the answers to these questions? 

Panelists:
1. Angelo Baglio, European Commission
2. Vazha Salamadze, Civil Society Institute, Georgia
3. Izabella Toth, CORDAID/CONCORD, the Netherlands

Facilitator:
Nilda Bullain, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary

10:30 – 11:00   

Coffee break

11:00 – 12:30

Breakout Sessions #6

Principles and Practices in CSO Accountability (Room: B1)
There has been increasing pressure on CSOs to demonstrate how they are accountable towards their multiple stakeholders, from government to donors to beneficiaries.  In this session we will explore, with the help of a diverse expert panel, what could be the most important and most useful common principles and practices in accountability across cultures and regions. The session will showcase the multifaceted nature of CSO accountability and will focus on the practical ways in which it can be advanced in different contexts.

There are no formal presenters, but resource people include:
1. Lukas Berg, Charity Star, Sweden
2. Goran Buldioski, Think Tank Fund, Open Society Foundations, Hungary
3. Miklos Marschall, Transparency International, Germany
4. Vazha Salamadze, Civil Society Institute, Georgia
5. James Shaw-Hamilton, The Humanitarian Forum, United Kingdom
6. Amy Bartlett, Open Forum for CSO Development Effectiveness, Belgium

Facilitator:
Nilda Bullain, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary

Foreign Funding: Addressing the Barriers (Room: B2)
Legal restrictions on foreign funding continue to impede the activities, and even the existence, of civil society organizations (CSOs) in many countries.  CSOs are hindered if they are unable to respond to government rhetoric with persuasive rhetorical arguments, solid legal arguments, and successful reform strategies.  Through interactive exercises, including a debate in which participants will argue in support of and against foreign funding constraints, this session will seek to develop and share concrete options for each of these knowledge gaps.  

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Netsanet Belay, CIVICUS, South Africa
2. Marcos Carillo, Lloan & Associates Law Firm, Venezuela
3. Hassan Shire Sheikh, East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project, Uganda (TBC)
4. Claudia Guadamuz, World Learning, Nicaragua

Facilitator:
Geoffrey Prewitt, United Nations Development Programme

Volunteerism Laws and Policies (Room: B3)
2011 is the 10 year anniversary of the International Year of the Volunteer 2001. Since IYV 2001, over 70 countries have enacted laws or policies on volunteerism. This session will consider the major lessons learned from these laws and policies, which have been drawn from the recently conducted comparative research on this topic and the Guidance Note on Drafting and Implementing Volunteerism Laws and Policies. Through a talk show format, advocates for volunteer laws will discuss: (1) can the law make a difference in this field; (2) under what circumstances should a country consider a law or policy on volunteering; (3) what are the preconditions for an effective volunteering law or policy initiative; (4) what is appropriate to regulate with law, and what can be left to a policy; and (5) what are the issues surrounding the implementation of volunteerism laws?

Panelists:
1. Mae Chao, United Nations Volunteers
2. Katerina Hadzi-Miceva Evans, European Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Hungary  
3. Mark Sidel, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
4. David Robinson, New Zealand Social and Civic Policy Institute

Facilitator:
Catherine Shea, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

Internet Security (Room: C3)
Civil society activists, particularly those working in challenging political environments, increasingly face the need to safeguard their internet communications and data. This training, conducted by Internews, an international media development organization that empowers local media, will present the fundamentals of Internet Security for those seeking greater protection of their Internet communications, for example, preventing email and Facebook accounts from being hacked. The session will also consider how to access content blocked by cybercensorship and methods for protecting electronic data. The training will be interactive – participants should bring their laptops and be prepared to practice the techniques presented during the session.

Trainer:
Eric Johnson, Internews, USA

12:30 – 14:00   

Lunch

14:00 – 15:30

Breakout Sessions #7

Donors Forum: A Discussion with Donors on Trends and Challenges (Room: B1)
This session will feature private donor perspectives on strategies for improving the legal environment for civil society and philanthropy. How have various trends with respect to civil society and philanthropy law affected the private foundation community? How have donors responded to the changing legal landscape, and where do they see their particular value added with respect to initiatives to improve the legal environment? How do they view their roles vis-à-vis other donors?

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Mall Hellam, Open Society Foundation, Estonia
2. Barry Lowenkron, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, USA
3. Bhekinkosi Moyo, Trust Africa, Senegal
4. Gerry Salole, European Foundation Center, Belgium

Facilitator:
Filiz Bikmen, Sabanci Foundation, Turkey

Cooperation with CSOs in the Provision of Social Services (Room: B2)
CSOs are providing important services everywhere, but not every country supports their involvement in state service provision. Governments at the central and local level are often wary of contracting with CSOs, which may be viewed as unreliable and lacking capacity, or alternatively, as somehow undermining government credibility. At the same time, with state budgets shrinking, more and more governments recognize the potential benefits of involving CSOs in service provision. This session will look at the pros and cons of CSO involvement in social service provision. Participants will learn about different models and practical policy and legal issues that arise when contracting out social services.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Veronika Mora, Hungarian Environmental Partnership Foundation, Hungary
2. Ricardo Wyngaard, Ricardo Wyngaard Attorneys, South Africa
3. Elizabeth Warner, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Kazakhstan
4. Consuelo Castro, El Centro Mexicano para la Filantropía, Mexico

Facilitator:
Michaela Lednova, United Nations Development Programme

Effective Strategies to Engage Legislatures (Room: B3)
Effective advocacy before the parliament or legislative body is fundamental to CSO law reform efforts. What types of arguments are most persuasive when approaching Members of Parliament? What internal and external factors affect their decision-making? Members of Parliament and successful CSO law reform advocates will offer practical tips on these and other questions of effective legislative advocacy. Participants will then have the opportunity to put their advocacy skills to the test through an interactive exercise.

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Mats Johansson,  Parliament of Sweden
2. Ana Novakovic, Centre for Development of Non-Governmental Organizations, Montenegro
3. Mahammad Guluzade, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Azerbaijan
4. Ghassan Moukheiber, Parliament of Lebanon (TBC)
5. Ala Talabani, Council of Representatives, Iraq (TBC)
6. Jamal Jawahiri, Iraqi Al-Amal Association, Iraq

Facilitator:
Luben Panov, Bulgarian Center for Not-for-Profit Law, Bulgaria

Internet Freedom and Freedom of Expression (Room: C12)
This session will begin with an overview of the trends and challenges to the right of all individuals to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, including through the Internet and new information communication technologies.  The session will then address how international law protecting the right to freedom of expression applies to the Internet and conclude by exploring whether other human rights norms, such as freedom of association, can help promote an enabling legal framework for the Internet.   

There will be no formal presentations, but resource people include:
1. Johan Hallenborg, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Sweden
2. Agnès Callamard, Article 19, United Kingdom

Facilitator:
Kristen McGeeney, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

15:30 – 16:00   

Coffee break

16:00 – 17:30

Closing Plenary (Room: Banquet Hall)

Closing Remarks
Minister Gunilla Carlsson, Minister for International Development Cooperation, Sweden

Facilitator:
Douglas Rutzen, International Center for Not-for-Profit Law, USA

18:30  

Departure for Gala Dinner to Restaurant Berns Salonger
Berzelii Park | P.O Box 163 40 | SE-103 27 Stockholm
Phone: +46 (0)8 566 322 00
http://www.berns.se/en

 

For more information, please review our frequently asked questions.