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The International Journal
of Not-for-Profit Law

Volume 4, Issue 2-3, March 2002

A publication of the International Center for Not-for-Profit Law

Table of Contents

Letter from the Editor

Articles

Charity Law and Alienation in Northern Ireland: The Findings of a Research Project and the Resonance Between Events in New York and Belfast
By Kerry J. O'Halloran

Freedom of Association in a Nigerian Community - Old Usages, New Rules
By Emeka Iheme

Liability of Not-for-Profit Organizations and Insurance Coverage for Related Liability
By Jerold Oshinsky and Gheiza M. Dias

El Proceso de Reforma del Heptaedro Legal del Tercer Sector
By Antonio L. Itriago Machado y Miguel Angel Itriago Machado

Reviews

American Foundations: An Investigative History
By Mark Dowie
Reviewed by Robert O. Bothwell

Case Notes

Central and Eastern Europe:
Poland

North America:
Canada

European Court of Human Rights:
Stankov and the United Macedonian Organization Ilinden v. Bulgaria (European Court of Human Rights: October 2001)

Country Reports

Asia Pacific:
China
| Japan | Vietnam

Central and Eastern Europe:
Regional | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Croatia | Poland | Slovakia | Republic of Srpska

Latin America and the Caribbean:
Regional | Brazil | Nicaragua | Venezuela

Middle East and North Africa:
Egypt

Newly Independent States:
Armenia | Moldova | Tajikistan

North America:
Canada

South Asia:
India

Western Europe:
Regional
| Austria | France

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Editorial Board

Case Notes: European Court of Human Rights

Stankov and the United Macedonian Organization Ilinden v. Bulgaria (European Court of Human Rights: October 2001)

In a case that tracks the earlier freedom of association decisions involving NPOs in Europe, the European Court of Human Rights came out strongly in favor of freedom of expression and assembly rights for the members of the Ilinden Association.  This organization sought to hold patriotic meetings and demonstrations about people it associated with Macedonian heritage and to do so in Bulgaria.  Naturally such meetings and demonstrations would provoke some tension, but the Court did not think that prohibiting such meetings was appropriate under the European Convention.  In other words, the Court held that the prohibition was not “ necessary in a democratic society.”  The conclusion can be summed up in the following statement from the Court: “…if every probability of tension and heated exchange between opposing groups during a demonstration were to warrant its prohibition, society would be faced with being deprived of the opportunity of hearing differing views on any question which offends the sensitivity of the majority opinion.”  This result in entirely consistent with the freedom of association cases discussed in previous issues and represents a true victory for freedom of expression and assembly.  KWS

 

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