Organization of the Islamic Conference FlagCivic Freedom Monitor: Organization of Islamic Cooperation

Introduction | Key Facts | Members | At a Glance
Key Legal Texts | Overview | News and Additional Resources
Last updated 19 March 2016

Introduction

The Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) is the second largest inter-governmental organization in the world after the United Nations. It was founded by a charter in 1969, following decades of deliberation by Muslim scholars and statesmen around the idea of forming a global Islamic organization. Today the OIC comprises 57 member states.

The OIC partners with international mechanisms (including every specialized UN agency), governments, and civil society organizations (CSOs) to address issues of concern to its member states and Muslims worldwide. In 2005, the OIC adopted a ten-year plan to address issues including terrorism, Islamophobia, poor governance, and economic inequality. The OIC has also become active in humanitarian assistance, and in 2008 established the Islamic Cooperation Humanitarian Affairs Department (ICHAD) to coordinate the activities of humanitarian organizations. In response to a devastating famine in Somalia in 2011, for instance, the OIC organized efforts by more than 40 Islamic aid organizations and other CSOs to provide relief supplies throughout the country. The OIC’s activities and assistance include long-term development projects as well, including health, education, and agriculture.  

Back to Top

Key Facts

Headquarters Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Members 57
Established September 25, 1969
Founding Document Charter of the Organization of the Islamic Conference
Head Secretary General
Governing Bodies Islamic Summit, Council of Foreign Ministers, General Secretariat
Key Human Rights Agreements Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam
Covenant on the Rights of the Child in Islam
[English] [عربي]
Key Judicial Bodies none

Back to Top

Members

Afghanistan Guyana Pakistan
Albania Indonesia Palestine
Algeria Iran Qatar
Azerbaijan Iraq Saudi Arabia
Bahrain Jordan Senegal
Bangladesh Kazakhstan Sierra Leone
Benin Kuwait Somalia
Brunei-Darussalam Kyrgyz Republic Sudan
Burkina-Faso Lebanon Suriname
Cameroon Libya Syrian Arab Republic*
Chad Malaysia Tajikistan
Comoros Maldives Togo
Cote d'Ivoire Mali Tunisia
Djibouti Mauritania Turkey
Egypt Morocco Turkmenistan
Gabon Mozambique Uganda
Gambia Niger United Arab Emirates
Guinea Nigeria Uzbekistan
Guinea-Bissau Oman Yemen

*Syria was suspended from the OIC on August 15, 2012 for the government's violent suppression of the revolt in the country.

Back to Top

At a Glance

Freedom of Association Legal Protection Neither the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam nor the Charter of the Organization of the Islamic Conference specifically mention freedom of association.
Judicial Bodies None
Civil Society Participation Some religious institutions are invited to attend and sometimes participate in the sessions of the conference.
Human Rights Defenders Current Status The establishment of an Independent Human Rights Commission was announced in 2009.

Back to Top

Key Legal Texts

Freedom of Association and Civil Society

Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam 1990
The Charter of the OIC 2004

Back to Top

Overview

The Charter of the OIC established the Organization’s objectives. Most importantly, the objectives are:

  1. To enhance and consolidate the bonds of fraternity and solidarity among the Member States;
  2. To safeguard and protect the common interests and support the legitimate causes of the Member States and coordinate and unify the efforts of the Member States in view of the challenges faced by the Islamic world in particular and the international community in general;
  3. To respect the right of self-determination and non-interference in the domestic affairs and to respect sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of each Member State;
  4. To ensure active participation of the Member States in the global political, economic and social decision-making processes to secure their common interests;
  5. To reaffirm its support for the rights of peoples as stipulated in the UN Charter and international law;
  6. To strengthen intra-Islamic economic and trade cooperation; in order to achieve economic integration leading to the establishment of an Islamic Common Market;
  7. To exert efforts to achieve sustainable and comprehensive human development and economic well-being in Member States;
  8. To protect and defend the true image of Islam, to combat defamation of Islam and encourage dialogue among civilizations and religions;
  9. To enhance and develop science and technology and encourage research and cooperation among Member States in these fields;

The Charter also established several important principles:

  1. All Member States commit themselves to the purpose and principles of the United Nations Charter;  
  2. Member States are sovereign, independent and equal in rights and obligations;
  3. All Member States shall settle their disputes through peaceful means and refrain from use or threat of use of force in their relations;
  4. All Member States undertake to respect national sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of other Member States and shall refrain from interfering in the internal affairs of others;
  5. Member States shall uphold and promote, at the national and international levels, good governance, democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms, and the rule of law;

Historically, the greatest challenge facing the OIC is its ability to establish a consensus among its members. The OIC’s existence is based on the idea that there is a commonality among its members that is stronger than any difference: Islam. However, there are numerous other important differences among member states, from language and culture, to political history and geographical location. Depending on a member state’s location, for instance, regional issues like Kashmir, Palestine, or joining the European Union have greater importance. Even history divides member states: Some members are former colonial empires, while others are former colonies. OIC membership has been particularly divided in the past ten years with regard to the Sunni and Shi’a split among Muslims. Accordingly, the OIC's credibility and potency remain limited, as most member states are members of other regional organizations thought to be more of a priority than the OIC. In addition, the OIC's does not have a very extensive record of accomplishments.

Freedom of Association and Partnership with Civil Society

The main charter of the OIC includes an article stipulating the importance of promoting member states’ support for good governance, democracy, human rights, fundamental freedoms, and the rule of law both nationally and internationally. However, the Charter does not mention freedom of association specifically. In fact, this term cannot be found in any of the documents available on the OIC website. 

Moreover, none of the OIC’s founding documents address partnership with independent CSOs. The Charter does, however, provide for the Independent Permanent Commission on Human Rights. The Commission is a standing body for human rights established to promote the civil, political, social and economic rights enshrined in the organization’s covenants and declarations and in universally agreed human rights instruments, in conformity with Islamic values. In addition, the OIC Council of Foreign Ministers adopted the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam in Cairo on August 5, 1990. (However the Cairo Declaration also does not address freedom of association).

The concept of human rights within the OIC is somewhat limited because it was established with the aim of protecting Muslims from colonization forces or other external forces. It does not address human rights obligations of member states directly. However, Article 2 item 7 in Chapter I of the new OIC Charter, adopted in Dakar Summit in 2008, urges member states to “uphold and promote good governance, democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms, and the rule of law” at the national and international levels. Moreover, Chapter VIII of the “Ten-Year Program of Action,” adopted by the Extra-ordinary Summit in Mecca in 2005, calls for greater efforts to increase political participation, achieve equity, concretize civil freedoms and social justice and promote transparency and accountability in the OIC member States.

The OIC’s partnership with civil society is generally limited to working with some religious institutions like Al Azhar in Egypt, or the Association of Muslim Scholars, that are invited to attend and sometimes participate in the sessions of the conference. The OIC also cooperates with the King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz International Centre for Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue (KAICIID), with which it has a project to promote religious dialogue and tolerance. Although these organizations are considered part of civil society in its broadest definition, however, many are directly linked to OIC member state governments, either through the appointment of their presidents or through funding. Hence, these organizations do not represent an independent civil society. As for activities with CSOs, the OIC’s website does not mention any joint activities with nongovernmental civil society organizations. 

In 2009, OIC Secretary General Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, in his meeting with the representatives of the board of directors of the Arab Turkish Organization for Science, Culture and Arts, stressed the importance of nongovernmental civil society organizations’ role in achieving comprehensive development in the Islamic world. Ihsanoglu recognized that CSOs are still weak and their activities are limited in Islamic countries. He stated that the OIC would develop a new strategy to engage CSOs in its various activities in order to allow for their effective contribution to discussions about issues facing Islamic nations. 

Until now, no concrete steps have been taken to develop such a strategy, however. 

Back to Top

News and Additional Resources

While we aim to maintain information that is as current as possible, we realize that situations can rapidly change.  If you are aware of any additional information or inaccuracies on this page, please keep us informed; write to ICNL at ngomonitor@icnl.org.

OIC issues statement on ways to fight terror and extremism (February 2015)
The Executive Committee of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) reiterated its unabated determination to stand steadfast against extremism and terrorism in all their forms. A final communique following OIC's extraordinary meeting to discuss the accelerating spread of the pandemic said OIC categorically rejects any attempt to link terrorism with any country, ethnic group or religion or culture or nationality. The statement also condemned the brutal crimes committed by ISIS against the Iraqi people.

News Archive

OIC Independent Permanent Human Rights Commission (IPHRC) concludes its 4th Session (February 2014)

OIC criticized for failing to stop bloodshed in Egypt

(September 2013)

For first time in OIC history, humanitarian NGOs granted consultative status (November 2012)

Arab League, OIC proposals out of step with progress on freedom of expression (September 2012)

Syria suspended from the OIC (August 2012)

U.S. Special Envoy to the OIC meets government, political, civil society, and religious leaders in Cairo (August 2012)

First International Conference on "Refugees in the Muslim World" in Turkmenistan (May 2012)

NGOs ask OIC’s new human rights body to engage civil society (February 2012)

Indonesia wants to be Host of OIC Human Rights Commission (February 2012)

Organization of Islamic Cooperation agrees to strengthen collaboration efforts (November 2011) 

Turkey Urges 57-country Organization of Islamic Cooperation to Aid Somalia (August 2011) 

Countries With Worst Religious Freedom Grades Are Mostly Islamic (August 2011)

Secretary General expresses deep concern over the worrying developments in Yemen (May 2011) 

The foregoing information was collected by the Arab Forum for Alternatives in Cairo, Egypt.

Back to Top