5 Things to Know About Thailand’s Proposed NPO Bill

Published: May 2021

(สามารถอ่านความเห็นฉบับภาษาไทยได้ในด้านล่าง)

In February 2021, the Thai Cabinet approved a bill drafted by the Office of the Council of State, entitled the Draft Act on the Operations of Not-for-Profit Organizations (draft NPO law” or “Bill”). The draft law presents a highly securitized approach to the non-profit sector which, as currently envisioned, threatens to violate numerous aspects of international law. ICNL and others – including UN Special Rapporteurs and local civil society organizations – submitted comments on the draft Bill during the March public hearing period, raising various concerns about the Bill.

Among other issues, we highlight five key concerns with the current draft NPO law:

1. Groups cannot operate without being registered, subject to criminal penalties.

Section 4 of the draft bill broadens the definition of an NPO to include informal groups,[1] and Section 5 requires all NPOs to register with the Ministry of Interior.[2] What this means, is the Bill as written would require every gathering of individuals carrying out any activity besides income or profit-sharing activities – such as a book club, football team, or community clean-up group – to register with the government or face criminal penalties. Section 10 outlines the criminal penalties for not registering, which include up to 5 years and/or fines of 100,000 baht (~$3200 USD) for “any person who operates a not-for-profit organization in the Kingdom without getting registered.” A mandatory registration requirement, especially applied to an overly broad definition of NPOs, undermines effective regulation of NPOs, opens the door to dangerous government overreach, and violates international law.

Thailand flag on building (photo credit: pixabay.com)

Furthermore, Section 5 requires NPOs to register under unspecified “criteria, methods and conditions” prescribed by the Minister of the Interior. As written, the bill allows the Minister of Interior to decide on registration criteria, giving scant assurance that registration procedures will conform to good regulatory practices. This language essentially grants the Minister a “blank check” to impose whatever registration requirements they feel are appropriate.

2. The Bill authorizes invasive inspections and burdensome reporting requirements.

Section 6 of the Bill allows the Registrar to enter any NPO office to inspect the “use of money or materials” and to obtain electronic communications, for any reason, and without any suspicion of criminal activity or due process protections. Section 6 further requires all NPOs to “disclose sources and amounts of funds or materials used in their implementation each year,” as well as annual tax returns, without any distinction as to the size or income level of different groups. Thus, a grassroots mutual aid organization, formed by three neighbors to deliver food to those in need, and which receives no external funding, would be subject to the same inspection and reporting requirements as a 100-employee public health organization with a substantial operating budget. Section 6 not only invites unjustified government interference in NPO affairs but could chill civic activities and burden service delivery and COVID relief with unnecessary administrative work.

3. The Bill vests full control and oversight of NPOs with the Minister of the Interior.

Section 4 of the Bill places regulatory authority of NPOs with the Ministry of Interior and its Department of Provincial Administration. The Ministry of Interior, with its security focus, is particularly ill-suited to regulate NPOs. Lacking the necessary expertise, it may seek to stifle legitimate civic activity, and in so doing, suppress community efforts to address public concerns. For this reason, it is exceedingly rare for a ministry of interior to play this role. While the regulatory authority for NPOs varies by country, we typically see organs with greater expertise on civil society, such as ministries focused on justice or social welfare, courts, or charitable commissions, overseeing the sector.

4. The Bill institutes blanket restrictions on foreign funding to NPOs.

Section 6 of the Bill permits NPOs to accept money or materials from non-Thai natural persons, legal entities or groups of individuals only for “activities in the Kingdom as permitted by the Minister.” This provision gives the Minister of Interior full discretion to authorize or block any foreign funding. Such blanket restrictions run counter to the right to free association, which embraces the ability to seek and secure resources, both domestic and international. Additionally, such restrictions diverge from Financial Action Task Force guidelines, which call for a “proportionate” and “targeted approach” in dealing with non-profits and allowing “legitimate charitable activity to continue to flourish.”[3]

5. There is no possibility of appeal under the Bill, including for termination.

The Bill fails to provide any appeal process for decisions taken by the Registrar, including suspension or termination. Section 9 of the Bill states that NPOs that violate or fail to comply with any of the substantive provisions will have their registration revoked, regardless of “any pending appeal to the revocation of registration.” Thus, almost any violation, no matter how minor, could result in revocation or termination of NPO registration. Under international norms, these are among the severest restrictions on free association, and are only permitted when there is a clear and imminent danger resulting in a flagrant violation of national law. In the absence of the right to appeal these decisions to an independent body, such provisions could easily lead to abuses of power and disproportionate actions by authorities.

The Council of State is reportedly considering these comments and may issue an updated draft NPO law soon. ICNL will continue to monitor legal developments around draft NPO laws in Thailand. For a more detailed analysis, including specific recommendations, please contact asia@icnl.org.

[1] i.e., “a group of individuals which are not established by any specific law, but implement activities that do not have the purpose of seeking income or profits to be shared.” Draft Act, Section 4.

[2] Except for potentially “Associations and foundations that have already registered per the Civil and Commercial Code, and the not-for-profit organizations registered under other laws.” Draft Act, Section 5.

[3] https://www.fatf-gafi.org/media/fatf/documents/reports/BPP-combating-abuse-non-profit-organisations.pdf

5 สิ่งที่ควรรู้เกี่ยวกับร่างกฎหมายว่าด้วยการดำเนินงานของ NPO ในไทย

เมื่อเดือนกุมภาพันธ์ 2564 คณะรัฐมนตรีไทยได้อนุมัติร่างกฎหมายว่าด้วยการดำเนินงานขององค์กรที่ไม่แสวงหารายได้หรือผลกำไรมาแบ่งปันกัน (“ร่างกฎหมาย NPO” หรือร่างพระราชบัญญัติ”) ซึ่งเสนอโดยสำนักงานคณะกรรมการกฤษฎีกา ร่างพระราชบัญญัติดังกล่าวกำหนดมาตรการควบคุมตรวจสอบการทำงานของภาคองค์กรไม่แสวงหาผลกำไรไว้อย่างเข้มงวด จากการพิจารณาในปัจจุบันพบว่าร่างพระราชบัญญัติดังกล่าวมีแนวโน้มละเมิดพันธกรณีระหว่างประเทศจำนวนมาก สถาบันระหว่างประเทศว่าด้วยกฎหมายเพื่อกิจการไม่แสวงหากำไร (International Center for Not-for-Profit-Law หรือ ไอซีเอ็นแอล) (สถาบันฯ”) องค์กรต่างๆ รวมถึงผู้รายงานพิเศษแห่งสหประชาชาติ (UN Special Rapporteur) พร้อมกับองค์กรภาคประชาสังคมในไทยได้เคยนำส่งความเห็นเกี่ยวกับร่างพระราชบัญญัติระหว่างการทำประชาพิจารณ์เมื่อเดือนมีนาคมโดยได้หยิบยกประเด็นที่น่ากังวลต่อร่างกฎหมายดังกล่าว

ในเดือนกรกฎาคม คณะรัฐมนตรีได้ออกหลักการพื้นฐานเกี่ยวกับการต่อต้านการฟอกเงินและการสนับสนุนทางการเงินแก่ผู้ก่อการร้ายซึ่งจะส่งผลให้มีการแก้ไขร่างพระราชบัญญัติ NPO ขึ้นใหม่ สถาบันฯได้จัดทำความเห็นต่อหลักกรดังกล่าว ทั้งนี้โปรดติดต่อ asia@icnl สำหรับความเห็นของสถาบันฯ ต่อหลักการดังกล่าว

จากเนื้อหาทั้งหมด ทางสถาบันฯขอชี้ให้เห็นข้อกังวล 5 ประการเกี่ยวกับร่างพระราชบัญญัติติข้างต้น ต่อไปนี้:

1. การรวมกลุ่มโดยไม่ขึ้นทะเบียนจะต้องรับโทษทางอาญา

มาตรา 4 ของร่างพระราชบัญญัติได้ขยายนิยามองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรไว้ให้รวมถึงการรวมกลุ่มของปัจเจกชนแบบไม่เป็นทางการ,[1] และมาตรา 5 ของร่างกฎหมายเดียวกันยังกำหนดให้บรรดาองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรทั้งหมดต้องขึ้นทะเบียนกับกระทรวงมหาดไทย[2] ซึ่งหมายความว่าหากพระราชบัญญัติดังกล่าวมีผลใช้บังคับจะส่งผลให้การรวมกลุ่มกันของปัจเจกชนเพื่อดำเนินการใดๆโดยไม่แสวงหาผลกำไร เช่น การรวมกันเป็นชมรมหนังสือ ทีมฟุตบอล กลุ่มอาสาในชุมชน ตกอยู่ภายใต้การบังคับให้ขึ้นทะเบียนกับรัฐหรือต้องเสี่ยงรับโทษทางอาญา โดยมาตรา 10 ของร่างพระราชบัญญัติได้วางแนวทางการลงโทษหากไม่ขึ้นทะเบียนซึ่งรวมถึงการจำคุกเป็นเวลาไม่เกิน 5 ปี และ/หรือ ต้องโทษปรับ 100,000 บาท (ประมาณ 3,200 เหรียญสหรัฐ) สำหรับ “บุคคลใดซึ่งปฏิบัติงานในฐานะองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรในราชอาณาจักรโดยไม่ได้ขึ้นทะเบียน”

การบังคับขึ้นทะเบียนประกอบกับนิยามขององค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรที่กว้างเกินไปย่อมบั่นทอนประสิทธิภาพการกำกับดูแลองค์การไม่แสวงหากำไร และเปิดช่องอันตรายให้รัฐบาลสามารถดำเนินการใดๆโดยมิชอบ ทั้งยังเป็นการขัดต่อกฎหมายระหว่างประเทศ

นอกจากนี้ มาตรา 5 ยังกำหนดให้องค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรต้องขึ้นทะเบียนภายใต้ข้อกำหนดซึ่งไม่ชัดเจน กล่าวคือให้เป็นไปตาม “เงื่อนไขวิธีการและคุณสมบัติ” ที่กำหนดโดยรัฐมนตรีว่าการกระทรวงมหาดไทย หากเป็นไปตามที่ระบุไว้อาจสรุปได้ว่าร่างพระราชบัญญัติให้อำนาจรัฐมนตรีว่าการกระทรวงมหาดไทยในการกำหนดเงื่อนไขการขึ้นทะเบียนซึ่งไม่เพียงพอต่อเงื่อนไขการขึ้นทะเบียนที่สอดคล้องกับการกำกับดูแลที่ดี การกำหนดถ้อยคำเช่นนี้จึงเสมือนกับการ “ยื่นกระดาษเปล่า” ให้แก่รัฐมนตรีในการกำหนดเงื่อนไขการขึ้นทะเบียนใดๆตามอำเภอใจ.

2. ร่างพระราชบัญญัติให้อำนาจในการแทรกแซงกิจการพร้อมกับเงื่อนไขการจัดทำรายงานที่เป็นภาระมากเกินไป

มาตรา 6 ของร่างพระราชบัญญัติให้อำนาจนายทะเบียนเข้าไปยังสำนักงานขององค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรเพื่อตรวจสอบ “การใช้เงินและทรัพย์สิน” และสามารถยึดข้อมูลการสื่อสารทางอิเล็กทรอนิกส์โดยปราศจากข้อสงสัยทางอาญาหรือขั้นตอนคุ้มครองทางกฎหมาย มาตรา 6 ยังกำหนดเพิ่มเติมให้องค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรทั้งหมดต้อง “เปิดเผยแหล่งที่มาและจำนวนเงินสนับสนุนหรือทรัพย์สินที่ใช้ในการดำเนินกิจการในแต่ละปี” รวมถึงรายละเอียดการนำส่งคืนภาษีประจำปี โดยไม่จำแนกว่าองค์กรนั้นมีขนาดหรือรายได้เท่าใด ดังนั้นหากมีองค์กรระดับรากหญ้าซึ่งจัดตั้งในชุมชนต่างๆเพื่อช่วยเหลือด้านอาหารแก่ผู้ที่ต้องการโดยปราศจากแหล่งเงินทุนภายนอก องค์กรดังกล่าวก็จะต้องอยู่ภายใต้เงื่อนไขการตรวจสอบและจัดทำรายงานเช่นเดียวกันกับองค์กรด้านสาธารณสุขซึ่งมีพนักงานกว่า 100 คนพร้อมกับงบประมาณในการดำเนินงานจำนวนมาก มาตรา 6 ไม่เพียงเปิดช่องให้รัฐบาลสามารถแทรกแซงกิจการขององค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรได้โดยง่าย แต่ยังไม่เปิดโอกาสให้ภาคประชาสังคมได้ดำเนินงานได้เต็มที่และเป็นภาระต่อการให้ความช่วยเหลือต่างๆและการฟื้นตัวจากสถานการณ์ Covid ด้วยมาตรการทางที่ไม่จำเป็น

3. ร่างพระราชบัญญัติมอบอำนาจในการควบคุมและกำกับดูองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรไว้กับรัฐมนตรีว่าการกระทรวงมหาดไทยอย่างเต็มที่

มาตรา 4 ของร่างพระราชบัญญัติกำหนดหน้าที่การกำกับดูแลองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรไว้กับกระทรวงมหาดไทยและกรมการปกครอง การที่กระทรวงมหาดไทยเป็นหน่วยงานที่มุ่งเน้นงานด้านความมั่นคงภายในนั้นทำให้ไม่เหมาะสำหรับการกำกับดูแลองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไร การขาดความชำนาญการนี้อาจบั่นทอนการดำเนินงานโดยชอบขององค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรซึ่งเท่ากับเป็นการกดทับความพยายามของภาคประชาสังคม/ชุมชนในการแก้ไขปัญหาสังคม ด้วยเหตุนี้หลายประเทศจึงมักไม่กำหนดให้รัฐมนตรีมหาดไทยเป็นผู้มีอำนาจดังกล่าว โดยปกติแล้วอำนาจการกำกับดูแลองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรอาจแตกต่างกันไปในแต่ละประเทศ แต่ทางสถาบันฯคุ้นเคยกับการกำกับดูแลโดยองค์กรที่มีความชำนาญเกี่ยวกับภาคประชาสังคม เช่น กระทรวงด้านงานยุติธรรม สวัสดิการสังคม ศาล หรือคณะกรรมการด้านการกุศล ในการกำกับดูแลภาคส่วนดังกล่าว เป็นต้น

4. ร่างพระราชบัญญัติกำหนดข้อห้ามไม่ให้องค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรสามารถเข้าถึงแหล่งทุนจากต่างประเทศ

มาตรา 6 ของพระราชบัญญัติกำหนดให้องค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรสามารถรับเงินหรือทรัพย์สินจากองค์กรที่มิได้จดทะเบียนในไทยหรือบุคคลที่มิได้มีสัญชาติไทยสำหรับ “กิจกรรมในประเทศเท่าที่ได้รับอนุญาตจากรัฐมนตรี” บทบัญญัติดังกล่าวมอบดุลยพินิจแก่รัฐมนตรีว่าการกระทรวงมหาดไทยอย่างเต็มที่ในการอนุญาตหรือปฏิเสธเงินทุนจากต่างชาติ บทบัญญัติเช่นนี้จึงขัดแย้งกับสิทธิในการรวมกลุ่มเป็นสมาคมซึ่งรวมถึงการสามารถเข้าถึงแหล่งทุนไม่ว่าจะเป็นภายในหรือต่างประเทศ นอกจากนี้ ข้อห้ามดังกล่าวยังไม่สอดคล้องกับคำแนะนำของคณะทำงานเฉพาะกิจเพื่อดำเนินมาตรการทางการเงิน (FATF) ซึ่งกำหนดให้มาตรการในการกำกับดูแลองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรต้องเป็นไปอย่าง “ได้สัดส่วน” และ “สอดคล้องกับเป้าประสงค์” พร้อมอนุญาตให้ “การดำเนินกิจกรรมไม่แสวงหากำไรโดยชอบด้วยกฎหมายสามารถเติบโตต่อไปได้”[3]

5. ร่างพระราชบัญญัติไม่มีขั้นตอนการอุทธรณ์คำสั่งต่างๆรวมทั้งกรณีถูกสั่งเพิกถอนทะเบียน

ร่างพระราชบัญญัติมิได้กำหนดกระบวนการในการอุทธรณ์คำสั่งของนายทะเบียนรวมถึงการสั่งให้เลิกหรือหยุดการกระทำ ทั้งมาตรา 9 ยังกำหนดให้องค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรซึ่งละเมิดหรือไม่ปฏิบัติตามบทบัญญัติใดๆจะต้องถูกยกเลิกทะเบียนไม่ว่าองค์กรนั้นจะได้ดำเนินการ “อุทธรณ์คำสั่งเพิกถอนการขึ้นทะเบียน” นั้นอยู่หรือไม่ก็ตาม ดังนั้นหากมีการละเมิดบทบัญญัติใดๆแม้ว่าเป็นความผิดเล็กน้อยเพียงใดก็ตามก็อาจนำมาซึ่งการยกเลิกหรือเพิกถอนการขึ้นทะเบียนขององค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรได้ ทั้งนี้ภายใต้บรรดาบรรทัดฐานระหว่างประเทศ การยกเลิกทะเบียนเป็นการจำกัดเสรีภาพในการรวมกลุ่มกันเป็นสมาคมอย่างร้ายแรงที่สุดซึ่งจะสามารถทำได้ต่อเมื่อมีอันตรายที่ชัดแจ้งและใกล้จะมาถึงอันส่งผลต่อการละเมิดกฎหมายของรัฐอย่างรุนแรง และเมื่อไม่กำหนดให้มีโอกาสใช้สิทธิอุทธรณ์คำสั่งดังกล่าวต่อหน่วยงานอิสระย่อมอาจนำไปสู่การใช้อำนาจเกินสัดส่วนและโดยมิชอบของเจ้าหน้าที่รัฐได้

ผลกระทบที่อาจเกิดขึ้น

ผลกระทบจำนวนมากอาจเกิดจากกฎหมายที่จำกัดการดำเนินงานของภาคประชาสังคม ทั้งนี้ภาคประชาสังคม รวมทั้งบรรดาองค์การไม่แสวงหากำไรซึ่งดำเนินงานเกี่ยวกับการเข้าถึงทรัพยากร การให้ความช่วยเหลือด้านมนุษยธรรม การศึกษา สาธารณสุข อาจถูกจำกัดโดยข้อห้ามและภาระการดำเนินงานเกินควร ทั้งนี้ยังพบว่าการให้ความช่วยเหลือแก่สถานการณ์ Covid-19 กลับลดลงอย่างมากในประเทศใช้มาตรการดังกล่าวซึ่งส่งผลกระทบต่อสุขภาพและการพัฒนา กฎหมายซึ่งจำกัดการทำงานของภาคประชาสังคมมักนำมาสู่การถอนตัวของแหล่งทุนและทำให้ภาคประชาสังคม ดังเช่น สาธารณสุขและการบรรเทาสาธารณภัยเข้าถึงแหล่งทุนที่หดตัวลง อย่างน้อยที่สุดภาคประชาสังคมไทยอาจเล็งเห็นค่าใช้จ่ายที่เพิ่มขึ้นจากการต้องปฏิบัติตามเงื่อนไขการจัดทำรายงาน การสอบบัญชีและอื่นๆเพื่อให้เป็นไปตามกฎหมายนี้

สถาบันฯทราบว่าทางสำนักงานคณะกรรมการกฤษฎีกากำลังพิจารณาความเห็นทั้งหลายเบื้องต้นและอาจเผยแพร่ร่างพระราชบัญญัติฉบับใหม่ในเร็วๆนี้ สถาบันฯจะยังคงติดตามความคืบหน้าของร่างกฎหมายเกี่ยวกับองค์กรไม่แสวงหากำไรในไทยต่อไป ทั้งนี้ โปรดติดต่อ asia@icnl.org สำหรับความเห็นโดยละเอียดและข้อเสนอแนะต่อร่างพระราชบัญญัติฯดังกล่าว