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United State-Barbados Income And Capital Tax Convention

UNITED STATE-BARBADOS INCOME AND CAPITAL TAX CONVENTION
Convention, with an Exchange of Notes, Signed at Bridgetown December 31, 1984;
Transmitted by the President of the United States of America to the Senate February 25, 1985
(Treaty Doc. No.99-3, 99th Cong., 1st
Sess.);
Reported Favorably by the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations December 11, 1985
(S. Ex. Rept. No. 99-9, 99th Cong., 1st Sess.);
Advice and Consent to Ratification by the Senate December 16, 1985;
Ratified by the President January 14, 1986;
Ratified by Barbados February 6, 1986;
Ratifications Exchanged at Washington February 28, 1986;
Proclaimed by the President September 9, 1986;
Entered into Force February 28, 1986.
GENERAL EFFECTIVE DATE UNDER ARTICLE 28: 1 JANUARY 1984
TABLE OF ARTICLES
Article 1———————————-General Scope
Article 2———————————-Taxes Covered
Article 3———————————-General Definitions
Article 4———————————-Residence
Article 5———————————-Permanent Establishment
Article 6———————————-Income from Real Property (Immovable Property)
Article 7———————————-Business Profits
Article 8———————————-Shipping and Air Transport
Article 9———————————-Associated Enterprises
Article 10——————————–Dividends
Article 11——————————–Interest
Article 12——————————–Royalties
Article 13——————————–Gains
Article 14——————————–Independent Personal Services
Article 15——————————–Dependent Personal Services
Article 16——————————–Directors’ Fees
Article 17——————————–Artistes and Athletes
Article 18——————————–Pensions, Annuities, Alimony, and Child Support
Article 19——————————–Government Service
Article 20——————————–Students and Apprentices
Article 21——————————- Other Income
Article 22——————————–Limitation on Benefits
Article 23——————————–Relief from Double Taxation

Article 24——————————–Non-discrimination
Article 25——————————–Mutual Agreement Procedure
Article 26——————————–Exchange of Information
Article 27——————————–Diplomatic Agents and Consular Officers
Article 28——————————–Entry into Force
Article 29——————————–Termination
Letter of Submittal———————of 11 February, 1985
Letter of Transmittal——————-of 25 February, 1985
Notes of Exchange———————of 31 December, 1984
Protocol ———————————of 18 December, 1991
Letter of Submittal (Protocol)——–of 22 September, 1992
Letter of Transmittal (Protocol)——of 30 September, 1992
Notes of Exchange (Protocol)——–of 18 December, 1991
Memorandum of Understanding—–of 18 December, 1991
The “Saving Clause”——————-Paragraph 3 of Article 1
MESSAGE
FROM
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
TRANSMITTING
THE CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
AND BARBADOS FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION
AND THE PREVENTION OF FISCAL EVASION WITH RESPECT TO
TAXES ON INCOME, TOGETHER WITH AN EXCHANGE OF NOTES,
SIGNED AT BRIDGETOWN ON DECEMBER 31, 1984
LETTER OF SUBMITTAL
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, February 11, 1985.
The PRESIDENT,
The White House.
THE PRESIDENT: I have the honor to submit to you, with a view to its transmission to the Senate
for advice and consent to ratification, the Convention between the United States of America and
Barbados for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with respect to

Taxes on Income (referred to hereafter as “the Convention”), together with an exchange of notes,
signed at Bridgetown on December 31, 1984.
The Convention is the first income tax treaty to be negotiated between the United States and
Barbados. In general, it follows the pattern of other recent United States income tax treaties and the
current draft United States Model Income Tax Convention. The Convention deviates from these
models, however, in several significant respects to reflect Barbados’ status as a developing country.
The Convention establishes maximum rates of tax at source on payments of dividends, interest and
royalties. It provides that the tax in the source country on dividends paid to a resident of the other
country may not exceed 15 percent in the case of portfolio dividends, and 5 percent in the case of direct
investment dividends. The Convention also provides for a maximum 12.5 percent rate of tax on interest
at source. However, interest received, guaranteed or insured by the Government of a Contracting State
is exempt from tax in the country of source. Royalties are also subject to a maximum tax rate of 12.5
percent.
The Convention contains rules found in most United States tax treaties regarding the taxation of
business profits, personal service income, transportation income, real property income and capital gains,
and the granting of relief from double taxation. In recognition of the fact that Barbados is a developing
country, the Convention provides somewhat broader rights for the source country to tax business profits
and certain types of personal service income than is generally true for United States tax treaties with
developed countries.
Also provided are the normal rules necessary for administering the Convention, including rules for
the resolution of disputes under the treaty and the exchange of information. The exchange of information
article provides, among other things, that bank information as well as other information with respect to
Barbadian and third-country residents will be made available to the United States competent authority
(Treasury). This is consistent with the more specific provisions of the agreement with Barbados on the
exchange of tax information under the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act of 1983, which
entered into force on December 3, 1984.
The Convention reflects the views of the Senate expressed in its consideration of other recent
United States tax treaties. For example, the rules for the taxation of gains on real property conform to
the provisions of the General Accounting Office to obtain access to certain tax information exchanged
under the treaty which is relevant to its function of overseeing the administration of United States tax
laws.
The Convention contains provisions designed to prevent third-country residents from taking
unwarranted advantage of the treaty by routing income through an entity established for that purpose in
one of the Contracting States. Because Barbados has very favorable tax law provisions which apply in
its “offshore sector” to certain foreign owned entities established in Barbados and doing business
outside of that country, it is very important that abuse of the Convention be prevented. The Convention
provides that benefits granted under the Convention to an item of income by one of the Contracting

States will not be granted if (1) less than 50 percent of the beneficial interest in the person receiving the
income is owned by residents of Barbados or the United States, or by United States citizens, or (2) a
substantial part of the income of the person receiving the income is used to meet liabilities to persons
other than residents of a Contracting State or United States citizens. Even if a person comes within
either of the conditions specified above, however, treaty benefits will be granted if the income is derived
in connection with, or is incidental to, an active business conducted in a Contracting State, other than the
business of managing investments. The effect of these rules with respect to the Barbadian offshore
sector is to deny treaty benefits with respect to income from traditional banking and insurance business
to Barbadian offshore companies which are investment companies, banks or insurance companies, other
offshore companies, as well as other Barbadian residents owned by third country residents, will have to
meet the active business test described above in order to receive treaty benefits.
During the course of the negotiations, the Barbados delegation expressed strong interest in including
provisions which would give an incentive for United States investment in Barbados and which would
treat gifts by United States persons to Barbadian charities as charitable contributions. The exchange of
notes accompanying the Convention provides assurances that if United States treaty policies with
respect to these two matters should change so as to permit the United States to agree to the provisions
sought by Barbados, the United States would reopen negotiations with a view to amending the treaty
appropriately.
The Convention will enter into force upon the exchange of instruments of ratification. The provisions
of the Convention will have effect for the United States as follows:
(i) in respect of tax withheld at the source for amounts paid or credited on or after the
first day of the second month following the date on which this Convention enters into force;
(ii) in respect of other taxes, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 1984.
The Convention will remain in effect indefinitely unless terminated by one of the Contracting States.
Either Contracting State may, on or before June 30 in any calendar year after the year 1988, give notice
of termination to the other Contracting State.
A technical memorandum explaining in detail the provisions of the Convention is being prepared by
the Department of the Treasury and will be submitted separately to the Senate Committee on Foreign
Relations.
The Department of the Treasury, with the cooperation of the Department of State, was primarily
responsible for the negotiation of this Convention. It has the approval of both Departments.
Respectfully submitted,
GEORGE P. SHULTZ.
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

THE WHITE HOUSE, February 25, 1985.
To the Senate of the United States:
I transmit herewith, for Senate advice and consent to ratification, the Convention between the
United States of America and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of
Fiscal Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income (“the Convention”), together with an exchange of
notes, signed at Bridgetown on December 31, 1984. I also transmit the report of the Department of
State on the Convention.
The Convention, in general, follows the pattern of other United States income tax treaties and the
current draft United States Model Income Tax Convention, but deviates from the model in certain
respects to reflect Barbados’ status as a developing country.
Among the principal features of the Convention are provisions to prevent third-country residents
from taking unwarranted advantage of the treaty. The Convention also establishes maximum rates of tax
at source on payments of dividends, interest, and royalties.
The exchange of notes indicates the willingness of the United States Government to reopen
discussions, should circumstances change, which would permit the inclusion of additional provisions to
create incentives to promote the flow of United States investment to Barbados.
I recommend that the Senate give early and favorable consideration to this matter, and give advice
and consent to ratification of the Convention, together with the related exchange of notes.
RONALD REAGAN.
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION
CONSIDERING THAT:
The Convention between the United States of America and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double
Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income, together with an
exchange of notes, was signed at Bridgetown on December 31, 1984, the texts of which are hereto
annexed;
The Senate of the United States of America by its resolution of December 16, 1985, two-thirds of
the Senators present concurring therein, gave its advice and consent to ratification of the Convention,
together with a related exchange of notes, subject to the following reservation:

“That the words ‘voting power’ in Article 10, paragraph 5 shall be construed to mean ‘voting
power or value’ for purposes of imposing the tax under section 531 of the Internal Revenue Code of
1954″;
The Convention, together with the exchange of notes, was ratified, subject to the above reservation,
by the President of the United States of America on January 14, 1986, in pursuance of the advice and
consent of the Senate, and was ratified on the part of Barbados on February 6, 1986;
The instruments of ratification of the Convention were exchanged at Washington on February 28,
1986, and accordingly the Convention entered into force on that date, its provisions to have effect as
specified in Article 28;
NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ronald Reagan, President of the United States of America, proclaim and
make public the Convention and related exchange of notes to the end that they be observed and fulfilled
with good faith on and after February 28, 1986, by the United States of America and by the citizens of
the United States of America and all other persons subject to the jurisdiction thereof.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I have signed this proclamation and caused the Seal of the United
States of America to be affixed.
DONE at the city of Washington this ninth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand
nine hundred eighty-six and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred
eleventh.
By the President:
RONALD REAGAN
George P. Schultz
Secretary of State
CONVENTION BETWEEN BARBADOS AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FOR
THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION AND THE PREVENTION OF FISCAL
EVASION WITH RESPECT TO TAXES ON INCOME
Barbados and the United States of America, desiring to conclude a convention for the avoidance of
double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income, have agreed as
follows:
ARTICLE 1
General Scope

1. This Convention shall apply to persons who are residents of one or both of the Contracting
States, except as otherwise provided in the Convention.
2. The Convention shall not restrict in any manner any exclusion, exemption, deduction, credit, or
other allowance now or hereafter accorded
a) by the laws of either Contracting State; or
b) by any other agreement between the Contracting States.
3. Notwithstanding any provision of the Convention except paragraph 4, a Contracting State may
tax its resident (as determined under Article 4 (Residence)), and by reason of citizenship may tax its
citizens, as if the Convention has not come into effect. For this purpose, the term “citizen” shall include a
former citizen whose loss of citizenship had as one of its principal purposes the avoidance of tax, but
only for a period of 10 years following such loss.
4. The provisions of paragraph 3 shall not affect
a) the benefits conferred by a Contracting State under paragraph 2 Article 9
(Associated Enterprises), and paragraphs 1 b) and 4 of Article 18 (Pensions, Annuities,
Alimony, and Child Support), and under Articles 23 (Relief From Double Taxation), 24 (Non-
Discrimination), and 25 (Mutual Agreement Procedure); and
b) the benefits conferred by a Contracting State under Articles 19 (Government
Service), 20 (Students and Apprentices), and 27 (Diplomatic Agents and Consular Officers),
upon individuals who are neither citizens of, nor have immigrant status in, that State.
ARTICLE 2
Taxes Covered 1. The existing taxes to which this Convention shall apply are
a) in the United States: the Federal income taxes imposed by the Internal Revenue
Code (but excluding the accumulated earnings tax, except provided in paragraph 5 of Article
10, the personal holding company tax, and social security taxes), and the excise taxes imposed
on insurance premiums paid to foreign insurers and with respect to private foundations. The
Convention shall, however, apply to the excise taxes imposed on insurance premiums paid to
foreign insurers only to the extent that the risks covered by such premiums are not reinsured
with a person not entitled to the benefits of this or any other convention which applies to these
taxes;
b) in Barbados: Income Tax (including premium income tax), Corporation Tax
(including the tax on branch profits), and Petroleum Winning Operations Tax.
2 The Convention shall apply also to any identical or substantially similar taxes which are imposed
after the date of signature of the Convention in addition to, or in place of, the existing taxes. The
competent authorities of the Contracting State shall notify each other of any significant changes which

have been made in their respective taxation laws and of any official published material concerning the
application of the Convention, including explanations, regulations, rulings, or judicial decisions.
ARTICLE 3
General Definitions 1. In this Convention, unless the context otherwise requires:
a)(i) the term ”United States” means the United States of America. When used in
a geographic sense it means the states thereof, the District of Columbia, the territorial
waters of the United States, and any area beyond the territorial waters which, in
accordance with international law and the laws of the United States is, or may hereafter
be, an area within which the rights of the United States with respect to natural resources
may be exercised. The term does not include Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam or
any other United States Possession or territory;
(ii) the term ”Barbados” means the island of Barbados and the territorial waters
thereof, including any area outside such territorial waters which in accordance with
international law and the laws of Barbados is an area within which the rights of
Barbados with respect to the seabed and subsoil and their natural resources may be
exercised;
b) the term ”person” includes an individual, an estate, a trust, a company, partnership
and any other body of persons;
c) the term “company” means any body corporate or any entity which is treated as a
body corporate for tax purposes;
d) the terms “enterprise of a Contracting State” and ”enterprise of the other Contracting
State” mean respectively an enterprise carried on by a resident of a Contracting State and an
enterprise carried on by a resident of the other Contracting State;
e) the term “competent authority” means:
(i) in the case of the United States of America, the Secretary of the Treasury or
his delegate;
(ii) in the case of Barbados, the Minister of Finance and Planning or his
authorized representative;
f) the term “national” means:
(i) in relation to the United States
a) any individual who is a citizen of the United States;
b) any company, association or other entity deriving its status as such
from the laws of the United States or any political subdivision thereof;
(ii) in relation to Barbados
a) any individual who is a citizen of Barbados;
b) any company, association or other entity deriving its status as such
from the laws of Barbados;
g) the term ”international traffic” means any transport by a ship or aircraft, except when
such transport is solely between places in the other Contracting State.

2. As regards the application of the Convention by a Contracting State any term not defined therein
shall, unless the context otherwise requires or the competent authorities agree to a common meaning
pursuant to the provisions of Article 25 (Mutual Agreement Procedure), have the meaning which it has
under the laws of that State concerning the taxes to which the Convention applies.
ARTICLE 4
Residence 1. For the purposes of this Convention:
a) the term “resident of Barbados” means:
(i) any person, other than a company, resident in Barbados for the purposes of
Barbados tax, but in the case of a partnership, estate or trust, only to the extent the
income derived by such partnership, estate or trust is subject to Barbados tax as the
income of a resident either in its hands or in the hands of its partners or beneficiaries;
and
(ii) a company whose business is managed and controlled in Barbados.
b) the term ”resident of the United States” means:
(i) any person, other than a company, resident in the United States for the
purpose of United States tax; but in the case of a partnership, estate or trust, only to the
extent that the income derived by such partnership, estate or trust is subject to United
States tax as the income of a resident, either in its hands or in the hands of its partners
or beneficiaries; and
(ii) a company created under the laws of the United States or a political
subdivision thereof.
2. Where by reason of the provisions of paragraph 1, an individual is a resident of both Contracting
States, then his status shall be determined as follows:
a) he shall be deemed to be a resident of the State in which he has a permanent home
available to him; if he has a permanent home available to him in both States, he shall be deemed
to be a resident of the State with which his personal and economic relations are closer (center of
vital interests);
b) if the State in which he has his center of vital interests cannot be determined, or if he
does not have a permanent home available to him in either State, he shall be deemed to be a
resident of the State in which he has an habitual abode;
c) if he has an habitual abode in both States or in neither of them, he shall be deemed to
be a resident of the State of which he is a national;
d) if he is a national of both States or of neither of them, the competent authorities of the
Contracting States shall settle the question by mutual agreement.

3. Where by reason of the provisions of paragraph 1 a company is a resident of both Contracting
States, then if it is created under the laws of a Contracting State or a political subdivision thereof, it shall
be deemed to be a resident of that State.
4. Where by reason of the provisions of paragraph 1 a person other than an individual or a
company is a resident of both Contracting States, the competent authorities of the Contracting States
shall settle the question by mutual agreement and determine the mode of application of the Convention
to such person.
ARTICLE 5
Permanent Establishment 1. For the purposes of this Convention, except as otherwise specified in this Article, the term
“permanent establishment” means a regular place of business through which the business of an enterprise
is wholly or partly carried on.
2. The term ”permanent establishment” shall include especially:
a) a place of management;
b) a branch;
c) an office;
d) a factory;
e) a workshop;
f) a store or premises used as a sales outlet;
g) a warehouse, in relation to a person providing storage facilities for others;
h) a mine, an oil or gas well, a quarry, or any other place of extraction of natural
resources;
i) a building site or construction, assembly or installation, or drilling rig or ship used for
the exploration or development of natural resources within a Contracting State, but only if such
site, or activity continues within the State for a period or periods aggregating more than 183
days in any twelve-month period (including the period of any supervisory activity connected
therewith), provided that a permanent establishment shall not exist in any taxable year in which
such site or activity continues within that State for a period or periods aggregating less than 30
days in that taxable year;
j) a dredging project within a Contracting State, but only where such project continues
within the State for a period or periods aggregating more than 120 days in any twelve-month
period (including the period of any supervisory activity connected therewith), provided that a
permanent establishment shall not exist in any taxable year in which such site, project or activity
continues within that State for a period or periods aggregating less than 30 days in that taxable
year;
k) the furnishing of services, including consultancy, management, technical and
supervisory services, within a Contracting State by an enterprise through employees or other
persons, but only if

(i) activities of that nature continue within the State for a period or periods
aggregating more than 90 days in a twelve-month period, provided that a permanent
establishment shall not exist in any taxable year in which such services are rendered in
that State for a period or periods aggregating less than 30 days in the taxable year; or
(ii) the services are performed within the State for an associated enterprise
(within the meaning of Article 9 (Associated Enterprises));
l) the maintenance of substantial equipment or machinery within a Contracting State but
only if such equipment or machinery is maintained within that State for a period of more than
120 consecutive days, provided that a permanent establishment shall not exist in any taxable
year in which such equipment or machinery is maintained within that State for a period or
periods aggregating less than 30 days in that taxable year.
3. Notwithstanding the preceding provisions of this Article, the term “permanent establishment” shall
be deemed not to include any one or more of the following:
a) the use of facilities solely for the purpose of storage, display, or delivery of goods or
merchandise belonging to the enterprise, other than goods or merchandise held for sale by such
enterprise in a store or premises used as a sales outlet;
b) the maintenance of a stock of goods or merchandise belonging to the enterprise
solely for the purpose of storage, display or delivery, other than goods or merchandise held for
sale by such enterprise in a store or premises used as a sales outlet;
c) the maintenance of a stock of goods or merchandise belonging to the enterprise
solely for the purpose of processing by another enterprise;
d) the maintenance of a regular place of business solely for the purpose of purchasing
goods or merchandise, or of collecting information, for the enterprise;
e) the maintenance of a regular place of business solely for the purpose of advertising,
for the supply of information, for scientific research or for similar activities which have a
preparatory or auxiliary character, for the enterprise.
4. If an enterprise of a Contracting State does not have a permanent establishment in the other
Contracting State under paragraphs 1, 2, and 3, but goods and merchandise are either:
a) subjected to processing in that other Contracting State by another person (whether
or not purchased in that other Contracting State); or
b) purchased in that other Contracting State (and such goods or merchandise are not
subjected to processing outside that other Contracting State.)
then such enterprise shall be considered to have a permanent establishment in that other Contracting
State to the extent that all or part of such goods or merchandise is sold by or on behalf of such
enterprise for use, consumption, or disposition in that other Contracting State.
5. Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2, a person (other than an agent of an
independent status to whom paragraph 6 applies) acting in a Contracting State on behalf of an
enterprise of the other Contracting State shall be deemed to be a permanent establishment of that
enterprise in the first-mentioned State if:

a) he has and habitually exercises in the first-mentioned State an authority to conclude
contracts on behalf of the enterprise, unless his activities are limited to those mentioned in
paragraph 3 which, if exercised through a regular place of business, would not make that regular
place of business a permanent establishment under the provisions of that paragraph (subject to
the provisions of paragraph 4); or
b) he habitually maintains in the first-mentioned State a stock of goods or merchandise
from which he regularly delivers goods or merchandise on behalf of the enterprise, and
additional activities conducted in that State on behalf of the enterprise have contributed to the
sale of the goods or merchandise.
6. An enterprise shall not be deemed to have a permanent establishment in a Contracting State
merely because it carries on business in that State through a broker, general commission agent, or any
other agent of an independent status, provided that such persons are acting in the ordinary course of
their business. However, when the activities of such persons are devoted substantially on behalf of that
enterprise, he shall not be considered an agent of independent status within the meaning of this
paragraph if the transactions between the agent and the enterprise were not made under arm’s length
conditions.
7. The fact that a company which is a resident of a Contracting State controls or is controlled by a
company which is a resident of the other Contracting State, or which carries on business in that other
State (whether through a permanent establishment or otherwise), shall not of itself constitute either
company a permanent establishment of the other.
Article 6
Income from Real Property (Immovable Property) 1. Income derived by a resident of a Contracting State from real property (including income from
agriculture or forestry) situated in the other Contracting State may be taxed in that other State.
2. The term “real property” shall have the meaning which it has under the law of the Contracting
State in which the property in question is situated.
3. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall apply to income derived from the direct use, letting, or use in
any other form of real property.
4. The provisions of paragraphs 1 and 3 shall also apply to the income from real property of an
enterprise and to income from real property used for the performance of independent personal services.
ARTICLE 7
Business Profits

1. The business profits of an enterprise of a Contracting State shall be taxable only in that State
unless the enterprise carries on or has carried on business in the other Contracting State through a
permanent establishment situated therein. If the enterprise carries on or has carried on business as
aforesaid, the business profits of the enterprise may be taxed in the other State but only so much of them
as is attributable to:
a) that permanent establishment;
b) sales in the other State of goods or merchandise of the same or similar kind as those
sold through that permanent establishment; or
c) other business activities carried on the other State of the same or similar kind as those
effected through that permanent establishment.
2. Where a resident of one of the Contracting States has a permanent establishment in the other
Contracting State, there shall in each Contracting State be attributed to the permanent establishment
business profits which would reasonably be expected to have been derived by it, if it were an
independent enterprise engaged in the same or similar activities under the same or similar conditions.
3. In determining the business profits of a permanent establishment, there shall be allowed as
deductions expenses which are incurred for the purposes of the permanent establishment, including a
reasonable allocation of executive and general administrative expenses, research and development
expenses, interest, and other expenses incurred for the purposes of the enterprise as a whole (or the
part thereof which includes the permanent establishment), whether incurred in the State in which the
permanent establishment is situated or elsewhere.
4. No business profits shall be attributed to a permanent establishment by reason of the mere
purchase by that permanent establishment of goods or merchandise for the enterprise.
5. Insofar as it has been customary in a Contracting State to determine the business profits to be
attributed to a permanent establishment on the basis of an apportionment of the total profits of the
enterprise to its various parts, nothing in paragraph 2 shall preclude that Contracting State from
determining the business profits to be taxed by such an apportionment as may be customary; the method
of apportionment adopted shall, however, be such that the result shall be in accordance with the
principles contained in this Article.
6. For the purposes of the preceding paragraphs, the business profits to be attributed to a
permanent establishment shall be determined by the same method year by year unless there is good and
sufficient reason to the contrary.
7. Where business profits include items of income which are dealt with separately in other Articles
of this Agreement, then, the provisions of those Articles shall not be affected by the provisions of this
Article, unless otherwise expressly provided by those Articles.
8. For the purposes of this Convention, the term “business profits” means income derived from any
trade or business, including the rental of tangible personal property.

Article 8
Shipping and Air Transport 1. Profits of an enterprise of a Contracting State from the operation of ships or aircraft in
international traffic shall be taxable only in that State.
2. For the purposes of this Article, profits from the operation of ships or aircraft in international
traffic include profits derived from the rental of ships or aircraft if such ships or aircraft are operated in
international traffic by the lessee or if such rental profits are incidental to other profits described in
paragraph 1.
3. Profits of an enterprise of a Contracting State from the use, maintenance, or rental of containers
(including trailers, barges, and related equipment for the transport of containers) used in international
traffic shall be taxable only in that State.
4. The provisions of paragraphs 1 and 3 shall also apply to profits from participation in a pool, a
joint business, or an international operating agency.
ARTICLE 9
Associated Enterprises 1. Where
a) an enterprise of a Contracting State participates directly or indirectly in the
management, control or capital of an enterprise of the other Contracting State; or
b) the same persons participate directly or indirectly in the management, control, or
capital of an enterprise of a Contracting State and an enterprise of the other Contracting State,
and in either case conditions are made or imposed between the two enterprises in their
commercial or financial relations which differ from those which would be made between
independent enterprises, then any profits which, but for those conditions would have accrued to
one of the enterprises, but by reason of those conditions have not so accrued, may be included
in the profits of that enterprise and taxed accordingly.
2. Where a Contracting State includes in the profits of an enterprise of that State, and taxes
accordingly, profits on which an enterprise of the other Contracting State has been charged to tax in that
other State, and the profits so included are profits which would have accrued to the enterprise of the
first-mentioned State if the conditions made between the two enterprises had been those which would
have been made between independent enterprises, then that other State shall make an appropriate
adjustment to the amount of the tax charged therein on those profits. In determining such adjustment,
due regard shall be paid to the other provisions of this Convention and the competent authorities of the
Contracting States shall if necessary consult each other.

3. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not limit any provisions of the law of either Contracting State
which permit the distribution, apportionment, or allocation of income, deductions, credits, or allowances
between persons, whether or not residents of a Contracting State, owned or controlled directly or
indirectly by the same interests when necessary in order to prevent evasion of taxes or clearly to reflect
the income of any of such persons.
ARTICLE 10
Dividends 1. Dividends paid by a company which is a resident of a Contracting State to a resident of the other
Contracting State may be taxed in that other State.
2. However, such dividends may also be taxed in the Contracting State of which the company
paying the dividends is a resident, and according to the laws of that State, but if the beneficial owner of
the dividends is a resident of the other Contracting State, the tax so charged shall not exceed
a) 5 percent of the gross amount of the dividends if the beneficial owner is a company
which owns at least 10 percent of the voting stock of the company paying the dividends;
b) 15 percent of the gross amount of the dividends in all other cases.
This paragraph shall not affect the taxation of the company in respect of the profits out of which the
dividends are paid.
3. The term “dividends” as used in this Article means income from shares or other rights, not being
debt-claims, participating in profits, as well as income from other corporate rights which is subjected to
the same taxation treatment as income from shares by the laws of the State of which the company
making the distribution is a resident.
4. The provisions of paragraph 2 shall not apply if the beneficial owner of the dividends, being a
resident of a Contracting State, carries on business in the other Contracting State, or which the
company paying the dividends is a resident, through a permanent establishment situated therein, or
performs in that other State independent personal services from a regular base situated therein, and the
dividends are attributable to such permanent establishment or regular base. In such case the provisions
of Article 7 (Business Profits) or Article 14 (Independent Personal Services), as the case may be, shall
apply.
5. The income of a Barbados company derived from the manufacture in Barbados of approved
products under the fiscal incentives legislation of Barbados (as in effect on the date of signature of the
Convention or as the Competent Authorities may agree pursuant to Article 25 (Mutual Agreement
Procedure)) shall not be subject to the United States accumulated earnings tax. In addition, a company
which is a resident of Barbados shall be exempt from United States accumulated earnings tax if

individuals (other than United States citizens) who are residents of Barbados control directly or
indirectly throughout the last half of the taxable year more than 50 percent of the entire voting power of
the company.
6. A Contracting State may not impose any tax on dividends paid by a company which is not a
resident of that State, except insofar as:
a) the dividends are paid to a resident of that State,
b) the dividends are attributable to a permanent establishment or a regular base situated
in that State; or
c) the dividends are paid out of profits attributable to one or more permanent
establishments of such company in that State, provided that the gross income of the company
attributable to such permanent establishment constituted at least 50 percent of the company’s
gross income from all sources.
Where subparagraph c) applies and subparagraphs a) and b) do not apply, the tax shall be subject to
the limitations of paragraph 2.
ARTICLE 11
Interest 1. Where interest is derived from sources within a Contracting State and beneficially owned by a
resident of the other Contracting State, the rate of tax imposed thereon in the first-mentioned State shall
not exceed 12.5 percent of the gross amount of the interest. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence,
interest derived from sources within a Contracting State, beneficially owned by a resident of the other
Contracting State, and paid in respect of a bond, debenture or other similar obligation issued,
guaranteed or insured by the government of that Contracting State or by a political subdivision, local
authority or instrumentality thereof shall be taxable only in that other State.
2. The term “interest” as used in the Convention means income from loans of every kind whether or
not secured by mortgage, and whether or not carrying a right to participate in the debtor’s profits, and in
particular, income from government securities, and income from bonds or debentures, including
premiums or prizes attaching to such securities, bonds or debentures. Penalty charges for late payment
shall not be regarded as interest for the purposes of this Convention.
3. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not apply if the recipient of the interest, being a resident of a
Contracting State, carries on in the other Contracting State in which the interest arises a business
through a permanent establishment situated therein, or performs in that other State independent personal
services from a regular base situated therein, and the indebtedness in respect of which the interest is
paid is effectively connected with that permanent establishment or regular base. In such a case, the
provisions of Article 7 (Business Profits) or Article 14 (Independent Personal Services) as the case may
be, shall apply.

4. Where, owing to a special relationship between the payer and the recipient or between both of
them and some other person, the amount of the interest, having regard to the indebtedness on which it is
paid, exceeds the amount which would have been agreed upon by the payer and the recipient in the
absence of such relationship, the provisions of this Article shall apply only to the last-mentioned amount.
In that case, the excess part of the payments shall remain taxable according to the law of each
Contracting State, due regard being had to the other provisions of this Agreement.
ARTICLE 12
Royalties 1. Royalties arising in a Contracting State and paid to a resident of the other Contracting State may
be taxed in that other State.
2. However, such royalties may also be taxed by the Contracting State in which they arise and
according to the laws of that State, but if the recipient is the beneficial owner of the royalties, the tax so
charged shall not exceed 12.5 percent of the gross amount of such royalties. The competent authorities
of the Contracting States shall by mutual agreement settle the mode of application of this limitation.
3. The term ”royalties” as used in this Article means payment of any kind received as a
consideration for the use of, or the right to use, any copyright of literary, artistic, or scientific work
including royalties in respect of motion pictures and works on film, tape or other means of reproduction
for use in connection with radio or television, any patent, trademark, design or model, plan, secret
formula or process, or for information concerning industrial, commercial, or scientific experience. The
term royalties also includes gains derived from the alienation of any such right or property which are
contingent on the productivity, use or disposition thereof.
4. The provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 shall not apply if the beneficial owner of the royalties, being
a resident of a Contracting State, carries on business in the other Contracting State, in which the
royalties arise, through a permanent establishment situated therein, or performs in that other State
independent personal services from a regular base situated therein, and the right of property in respect
of which the royalties are paid is effectively connected with such permanent establishment or regular
base. In such case the provisions of Article 7 (Business Profits) or Article 14 (Independent Personal
Services), as the case may be, shall apply.
5. Where, by reason of a special relationship between the payer and the beneficial owner or
between both of them and some other person, the amount of the royalties, having regard to the use,
right, or information for which they are paid, exceeds the amount which would have been agreed upon
by the payer and the beneficial owner in the absence of such relationship, the provisions of this Article
shall apply only to the last-mentioned amount. In such case the excess part of the payments shall remain
taxable according to the laws of each Contracting State, due regard being had to the other provisions of
the Convention.

6. Royalties shall be deemed to be derived from sources within a Contracting State when the payer
is that State itself, a political subdivision, a local authority or a resident of that State. Where, however,
the person paying the royalties, whether he is a resident of a Contracting State or not, has in a
Contracting State a permanent establishment or regular base in connection with which the obligation to
pay the royalties was incurred, and those royalties are borne by the permanent establishment or regular
base, then such royalties shall be deemed to be derived from sources within the Contracting State in
which the permanent establishment or regular base is situated. Notwithstanding the preceding provisions
of this paragraph, where the royalties are paid for the use of or the right to use a right or property within
a Contracting State, the royalties shall be deemed to arise in that State.
ARTICLE 13
Gains 1. Gains derived by a resident of a Contracting State from the alienation of real property situated in
the other Contracting State may be taxed in that other State.
2. For the purposes of this Article:
a) the term “real property situated in the other Contracting State”, where the United
States is that other Contracting State, includes a United States real property interest, and real
property referred to in Article 6 which is situated in the United States; and
b) the term “real property situated in the other Contracting State”, where Barbados is
that other Contracting State, shall have the meaning which it has under the Laws in force from
time to time in Barbados and, without limiting the foregoing, includes:
(i) real property referred to in Article 6;
(ii) shares or comparable interests in a company, the assets of which consist
wholly or principally of real property situated in Barbados; and
(iii) an interest in a partnership, trust or estate, the assets of which consist wholly
or principally of real property situated in Barbados.
3. Gains from the alienation of personal property which are attributable to a permanent
establishment which an enterprise of a Contracting State has in the other Contracting State, or which are
attributable to a regular base available to a resident of a Contracting State in the other Contracting State
for the purpose of performing independent personal services, and gains from the alienation of such a
permanent establishment (alone or with the whole enterprise) or such a regular base, may be taxed in
that other State.
4. Gains derived by an enterprise of a Contracting State from the alienation of ships, aircraft, or
containers operated in international traffic shall be taxable only in that State.
5. Gains described in Article 12 (Royalties) shall be taxable only in accordance with the provisions
of Article 12.

6. Gains from the alienation of any property other than property referred to in paragraphs 1 through
5 shall be taxable only in the Contracting State of which the alienator is a resident.
ARTICLE 14
Independent Personal Services 1. Income derived by an individual who is a resident of one of the Contracting States from the
performance of personal services in an independent capacity may be taxed by that Contracting State.
Except as provided in paragraph 2, such income shall be exempt from tax by the other Contracting
State.
2. Income derived by an individual who is a resident of one of the Contracting States from the
performance of personal services in an independent capacity in the other Contracting State may be
taxed by that other Contracting State, if:
a) he has a regular base regularly available to him in the other Contracting State for the
purpose of performing his activities; in that case, only so much of the income as is attributable to
that regular base may be taxed in that other Contracting State;
b) he is present in that other Contracting State for a period or periods aggregating 90
days or more in the taxable year; or
c) the net income derived in the taxable year from residents of that other Contracting
State for the performance of such services in the other Contracting State exceeds 5,000 United
States dollars or its equivalent in Barbados currency.
ARTICLE 15
Dependent Personal Services 1. Subject to the provisions of Article 16 (Directors’ Fees), 18 (Pensions, Annuities, Alimony and
Child Support), and 19 (Government Service), salaries, wages and other similar remuneration derived
by a resident of a Contracting State in respect of an employment shall be taxable only in that State
unless the employment is exercised in the other Contracting State. If the employment is so exercised,
such remuneration as is derived therefrom may be taxed in that other State.
2. Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph 1, remuneration derived by a resident of a
Contracting State in respect of an employment exercised in the other Contracting State shall be taxable
only in the first-mentioned State if:
a) the remuneration earned in the other Contracting State in the calendar year
concerned does not exceed 5,000 United States dollars or its equivalent in Barbados currency;
b) the recipient is present in the other Contracting State for a period or periods not
exceeding in the aggregate 183 days in the calendar year concerned;
c) the remuneration is paid by, or on behalf of, an employer who is not a resident of the
other State; and

d) such remuneration is not borne by a permanent establishment or regular base which
the employer has in the other State.
3. Notwithstanding the preceding provisions of this Article, remuneration derived by a resident of a
Contracting State in respect of an employment as a member of the regular complement of a ship or
aircraft operated in international traffic may be taxed only in that State.
ARTICLE 16
Directors’ Fees Directors’ fees and other similar payments derived by a resident of a Contracting State for services
rendered in the other Contracting State in his capacity as a member of the board of directors of a
company which is a resident of the other Contracting State may be taxed in that other Contracting State.
ARTICLE 17
Artistes and Athletes 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of Articles 14 (Independent Personal Services) and 15
(Dependent Personal Services), income derived by a resident of a Contracting State as a public
entertainer, such as a theatre, motion picture, radio, or television artiste, or a musician, or as an athlete,
from his personal activities as such exercised in the other Contracting State, may be taxed in that other
Contracting State, except where the amount of the gross receipts derived by such entertainer or athlete,
not including expenses reimbursed to him or borne on his behalf, from such activities does not exceed
250 United States dollars or its equivalent in Barbadian currency per day, or 4,000 United States
dollars or its equivalent in Barbadian currency in the taxable year.
2. Where income in respect of personal activities of an entertainer or athlete accrues not to that
entertainer or athlete himself but to another person, that income may, notwithstanding the provisions of
Articles 7 (Business Profits), 14 (Independent Personal Services), and 15 (Dependent Personal
Services) be taxed in the Contracting State in which the activities of the entertainer or athlete are
exercised, unless it is established that neither the entertainer or athlete nor persons related thereto
participate directly or indirectly in the profits of that other person in any manner, including the receipt of
deferred remuneration, bonuses, fees, dividends, partnership distributions, or other distributions.
3. The provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 shall not apply
a) to income derived from activities performed in a Contracting State by entertainers or
athletes if the visit to that Contracting State is substantially supported by public funds of the
other Contracting State, including any political subdivision, local authority or statutory body
thereof;

b) to a nonprofit organization no part of the income of which was payable to, or
otherwise inures to the benefit of, any private proprietor, member or shareholder thereof, or
other individual; or
c) to an entertainer or athlete in respect of services provided to an organization referred
to in subparagraph b).
ARTICLE 18
Pensions, Annuities, Alimony, and Child Support 1. Subject to the provisions of Article 19 (Government Service)
a) pensions and other similar remuneration derived and beneficially owned by a resident
of a Contracting State in consideration of past employment shall be taxable only in that State;
and
b) social security benefits and other public pensions paid by a Contracting State to a
resident of the other Contracting State or a citizen of the United States shall be taxable only in
the first-mentioned State.
2. Annuities derived and beneficially owned by a resident of a Contracting State shall be taxable
only in that State. The term “annuities” as used in this paragraph means a stated sum paid periodically at
stated times during a specified number of years, under an obligation to make the payments in return for
adequate and full consideration (other than services rendered).
3. Alimony paid to a resident of a Contracting State shall be taxable only in that State. The term
“alimony” as used in this paragraph means periodic payments made pursuant to a written separation
agreement or a decree of divorce, separate maintenance, or compulsory support, which payments are
taxable to the recipient under the laws of the State of which he is a resident.
4. Periodic payments for the support of a minor child made pursuant to a written separation
agreement or a decree of divorce, separate maintenance, or compulsory support, paid by a resident of a
Contracting State to a resident of the other Contracting State, shall be taxable only in the first-mentioned
State.
ARTICLE 19
Government Service Remuneration, including a pension paid from the public funds of a Contracting State or a political
subdivision or local authority thereof to a citizen of that State in respect of services rendered in the
discharge of functions of a governmental nature shall be taxable only in that State. However, the
provisions of Article 14 (Independent Personal Services), Article 15 (Dependent Per Services) or
Article 17 (Artistes and Athletes), as the case may be, shall apply, and the preceding sentence shall not

apply, to remuneration paid in respect of services rendered in connection with a business carried on by
a Contracting State or a political subdivision or local authority thereof.
ARTICLE 20
Students and Apprentices 1. Payments which a student or business apprentice who is or was immediately before visiting a
Contracting State a resident of the other Contracting State who is present in the first-mentioned State
for the purpose of his full-time education or training receives for the purpose of his maintenance,
education, or training shall not be taxed in that State, provided that such payments arise outside that
State.
2. Notwithstanding Article 4 (Residence), an individual to whom paragraph 1 applies and who
immediately before visiting or becoming temporarily present in a Contracting State was a resident of the
other Contracting State may elect as an alternative to the provisions of that paragraph to be treated for
all tax purposes of the first-mentioned State including this Convention, as resident of that State. The
election shall apply to all periods during the taxable year of the election and subsequent taxable years
during which the individual qualifies under paragraph 1 and may not be revoked except with the consent
of the competent authority of that first-mentioned State.
ARTICLE 21
Other Income 1. Items of income of a resident of a Contracting State, wherever arising, not dealt within the
foregoing Articles of this Convention shall be taxable only in that State.
2. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not apply to income, other than income from immovable
property as defined in paragraph 2 of Article 6 (Income from Real Property (Immovable Property)), if
the beneficial owner of such income, being a resident of a Contracting State, carries on business in the
other Contracting State through a permanent establishment situated therein, or performs in that other
State independent personal services from a regular base situated therein, and the right or property in
respect of which the income is paid is effectively connected with such permanent establishment or
regular base. In such case the provisions of Article 7 (Business Profits) or Article 14 (Independent
Personal Services), as the case may be, shall apply.
3. Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2, items of income of a resident of a
Contracting State not dealt with in the foregoing Articles of this Convention and arising in that other
Contracting State may be taxed in that other State.

ARTICLE 22
Limitation on Benefits 1. A person which is a resident of a Contracting State and which derives income from sources
within the other Contracting State shall not be entitled, in that other Contracting State, to the benefits of
Article 6 (Income from Real Property (Immovable Property)) through Article 23 (Relief from Double
Taxation) if:
a) 50 percent or less of the beneficial interest in such person (or in the case of a
company, 50 percent or less of the number of shares of each class of the company’s shares) is
owned, directly or indirectly, by any combination of one or more individual residents of a
Contracting State or citizens of the United States; or
b) the income of such person is used in substantial part, directly or indirectly, to meet
liabilities (including liabilities for interest or royalties) to persons who are residents of a State
other than a Contracting State, or who are not citizens of the United States.
2. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not apply if the income derived from the other Contracting
State is derived in connection with, or is incidental to, the active conduct by such person of a trade or
business in the first-mentioned Contracting State (other than the business of making or managing
investments). The preceding sentence shall not apply with respect to a person engaged in the business of
banking or insurance in a Contracting State, if the income of such person is subject to tax in the
Contracting State in which it is resident at a rate of tax which is substantially below the rate of tax
generally applicable to business income in that State. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, the
income of such a bank which is not derived from the conduct of a banking business (including but not
limited to income attributable to the taking of deposits and making of loans, managing of investments and
performance of trust or other services as fiduciary), shall be subject to the provisions of the first
sentence of this paragraph.
3. The provisions of paragraph 1 shall not apply if the person deriving the income is a company
which is a resident of a Contracting State in whose principal class of shares there is a substantial and
regular trading on a recognized stock exchange. For purposes of the preceding sentence, the term
“recognized stock exchange” means:
a) The NASDAQ System owned by the National Association of Securities Dealers,
Inc. and any stock exchange registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission as a
national securities exchange for purposes of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
b) any other stock exchange agreed upon by the competent authorities of the
Contracting States.
4. If one of the Contracting States proposes to deny benefits to a resident of the other Contracting
State by reason of this Article, the competent authorities of the Contracting States shall, upon request of
the competent authority of the other Contracting State, consult each other.
ARTICLE 23

Relief from Double Taxation 1. In accordance with the provisions and subject to the limitations of the law of the United States (as
it may be amended from time to time without changing the general principle hereof), the United States
shall allow to a resident or citizen of the United States as a credit against the United States tax on
income:
a) the income tax paid to Barbados by or on behalf of such citizen or resident; and
b) in the case of a United States company owning at least 10 percent of the voting stock
of a company which is a resident of Barbados and from which the United States company
receives dividends, the income tax paid to Barbados by or on behalf of the distributing company
with respect to the profits out of which the dividends are paid.
For the purposes of this paragraph, the taxes referred to in paragraphs l b) and 2 of Article 2 (Taxes
Covered) shall be considered income taxes.
2. In accordance with the provisions and subject to the limitations of the law of Barbados (as it may
be amended from time to time without changing the general principle hereof) Barbados shall allow to a
resident of Barbados as a credit against the Barbados tax on income:
a) the income tax paid to the United States by or on behalf of such resident; and
b) in the case of a Barbados company owning at least 10 percent of the voting stock of
a company which is a resident of the United States from which it receives dividends the income
tax paid to the United States by or on behalf of the distributing company with respect to the
profits out of which the dividends are paid.
For the purposes of this paragraph, the taxes referred to in paragraphs 1 a) and 2 of Article 2 (Taxes
Covered) shall be considered income taxes. Credit allowed solely by reasons of the preceding sentence,
when added to otherwise allowable credits for taxes referred to in paragraphs 1 a) and 2 of Article 2,
shall not in any taxable year exceed that proportion of the Barbados tax on income which taxable
income arising in the United States bears to total taxable income.
3. For the purposes of allowing relief from double taxation pursuant to this Article, income shall be
deemed to arise exclusively as follows:
a) income derived by a resident of a Contracting State which may be taxed in the other
Contracting State in accordance with this Convention (other than solely by reason of citizenship
in accordance with paragraph 3 of Article 1 (General Scope)) shall be deemed to arise in that
other State:
b) income derived by a resident of a Contracting State which may not be taxed in the
other Contracting State in accordance with the Convention shall be deemed to arise in the first-
mentioned State.
ARTICLE 24
Non-discrimination

1. Nationals of a Contracting State shall not be subjected in the other Contracting State to any
taxation or any requirement connected therewith which is other or more burdensome than the taxation
and connected requirements to which nationals of that other State in the same circumstances are or may
be subjected. This provision shall apply to persons who are not residents of one or both of the
Contracting States. However, for the purposes of United States tax, a United States national who is not
a resident of the United States and a Barbados national who is not a resident of the United States are
not in the same circumstances.
2. The taxation on a permanent establishment which an enterprise of a Contracting State has in the
other Contracting State shall not be less favorably levied in that other State than the taxation levied on
enterprises of that other State carrying on the same activities. This provision shall not be construed as
obliging a Contracting State to grant to residents of the other Contracting State any personal
allowances, reliefs, and reductions for taxation purposes on account of civil status or family
responsibilities which it grants to its own residents. The provisions of this paragraph shall not be
construed to prevent Barbados from applying its tax on branch profits, and its tax on the premium
income of nonresident insurers or foreign insurance companies at the rates prescribed under the Income
Tax Act, nor to prevent the United States from imposing an additional tax on the income of a permanent
establishment maintained by a resident of Barbados in the United States.
3. Except where the provisions of paragraph 1 of Article 9 (Associated Enterprises), paragraph 6 of
Article II (Interest). or paragraph 5 of Article 12 (Royalties) apply, interest, royalties, and other
disbursements paid by a resident of a Contracting State to a resident of the other Contracting State
shall, for the purposes of determining the taxable profits of the first-mentioned resident, be deductible
under the same conditions as if they had been paid to a resident of the first-mentioned State.
4. Enterprises of a Contracting State, the capital of which is wholly or partly owned or controlled,
directly or indirectly, by one or more residents of the other Contracting State, shall not be subjected in
the first-mentioned State to any taxation or any requirement connected therewith which is other or more
burdensome than the taxation and connected requirements to which other similar enterprises of the first-
mentioned State are or may be subjected.
5. In this Article the term “taxation” means taxes which are the subject of this Agreement.
ARTICLE 25
Mutual Agreement Procedure 1. Where a person considers that the actions of one or both of the Contracting States result or will
result for him in taxation not in accordance with the provisions of this Convention, he may, irrespective
of the remedies provided by the domestic law of those States, present his case to the competent
authority of the Contracting State of which he is a resident or, if his case comes under paragraph 1 of
Article 24, to that of the Contracting State of which he is a national.

2. The competent authority shall endeavour, if the objection appears to it to be justified and if it is
not itself able to arrive at a satisfactory solution, to resolve the case by mutual agreement with the
competent authority of the other Contracting State, with a view to the avoidance of taxation which is not
in accordance with the Convention. Any agreement reached shall be implemented notwithstanding any
time limits or other procedural limitations in the domestic law of the Contracting States.
3. The competent authorities of the Contracting States shall endeavour to resolve by mutual
agreement any difficulties or doubts arising as to the interpretation or application of the Convention. In
particular the competent authorities of the Contracting States may agree
a) to the same attribution of income, deductions, credits, or allowances of an enterprise
of a Contracting State to its permanent establishment situated in the other Contracting State;
b) to the same allocation of income, deductions, credits, or allowances between
persons;
c) to the same characterization of particular items of income;
d) to the same application of source rules with respect to particular items of income;
e) to a common meaning of a term;
f) to increases in any specific dollar amounts referred to in the Convention to reflect
economic or monetary developments; and
g) to the application of the provisions of domestic law regarding penalties, fines, and
interest in a manner consistent with the purposes of the Convention.
They may also consult together for the elimination of double taxation in cases not provided for in the
Convention.
4. The competent authorities of the Contracting States may communicate with each other directly
for the purpose of reaching an agreement in the sense of the preceding paragraphs.
ARTICLE 26
Exchange of Information 1. The competent authorities of the Contracting States shall exchange such information as is
necessary for carrying out the provisions of this Convention or of the domestic laws of the Contracting
States concerning taxes covered by the Convention insofar as the taxation thereunder is in accordance
with this Convention, in particular for the prevention of fraud and evasion of such taxes. The exchange
of information is not limited by Article 1 (General Scope). Any information received by a Contracting
State shall be treated as secret in the same manner as information obtained under the domestic laws of
that State and shall be disclosed only to persons or authorities (including courts and administrative
bodies) involved in the assessment, collection, or administration of, the enforcement or prosecution in
respect of, or the determination of appeals in relation to, the taxes covered by the Convention. Such
persons or authorities shall use the information only for such purposes. They may disclose the
information in public court proceedings or in judicial decisions. The competent authorities shall, through

consultations, develop appropriate conditions, methods, and techniques concerning the matters
respecting which such exchange shall be made, as well as exchanges of information regarding avoidance
of tax where appropriate. Information shall not be disclosed to any third jurisdiction for any purpose
without the consent of the Contracting State originally furnishing the information.
2. If information is requested by a Contracting State in accordance with this Article, the other
Contracting State shall endeavour to obtain the information to which the request relates in the same
manner and to the same extent as if the tax of the first-mentioned State were the tax of that other State
and were being imposed by that other State. If specifically requested by the competent authority of the
other Contracting State, the competent authority of the other Contracting State shall endeavour to
provide information under this Article in the form of depositions of witnesses and authenticated copies of
unedited original documents (including books, papers, statements, records, accounts and writings) to the
same extent such depositions and documents can be obtained under the laws and administrative
practices of that other State with respect to its own taxes.
3. In no case shall the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 be construed so as to impose on a
Contracting State the obligation-
a) to carry out administrative measures at variance with the laws and administrative
practice of that or of the other Contracting State;
b) to supply information which is not obtainable under the laws or in the normal course
of the administration of that or of the other Contracting State;
c) to supply information which would disclose any trade, business, industrial,
commercial, or professional secret or trade process, or information the disclosure of which
would be contrary to public policy (ordre public).
4. For the purposes of this Article, the Convention shall apply:
a) in the case of Barbados to the taxes covered by the Convention; and
b) in the case of the United States to the
(i) Federal income taxes;
(ii) Federal taxes on self-employment income;
(iii) Federal taxes on transfers to avoid income tax,
(iv) Federal estate and gift taxes; and
(v) Federal excise taxes.
ARTICLE 27
Diplomatic Agents and Consular Officers Nothing in this Convention shall affect the fiscal privileges of diplomatic agents or consular officers
under the general rules of international law or under the provisions of special agreements.
ARTICLE 28

Entry into Force 1. This Convention shall be ratified and instruments of ratification shall be exchanged as soon as
possible.
2. The Convention shall enter into force upon the exchange of instruments of ratification and its
provisions shall have effect
a) in the United States:
(i) in respect of tax withheld at the source for amounts paid or credited on or
after the first day of the second month following the date on which this Convention
enters into force;
(ii) in respect of other taxes, for taxable years beginning on or after January 1,
1984.
b) in Barbados:
(i) in respect of income tax and corporation tax for the income year beginning
January 1, 1984;
(ii) in respect of petroleum winning operations tax for any accounting year
beginning on or after January 1, 1984; and
(iii) in respect of tax on branch profits and tax on premium income of insurance
companies for the income year beginning January 1, 1984.
ARTICLE 29
Termination 1. This Agreement shall continue in effect indefinitely but either Contracting State may, on or before
June 30 in any calendar year after the year 1988, give notice of termination to the other Contracting
State and in such event this Agreement shall cease to have effect:
a) in the United States:
(i) in respect of taxes withheld at source on amounts paid or credited to non-
residents on or after the first day of January in the calendar year next following that in
which the notice is given: and
(ii) in respect of other United States tax, for taxable years beginning on or after
the first day of January in the calendar year following that in which the notice is given;
b) in Barbados:
(i) in respect of income tax, corporation tax, tax on branch profits and tax on
premium income of insurance companies for the income year beginning the first day of
January in the calendar year next following that in which such notice is given; and
(ii) in respect of the petroleum wining operations tax, for any accounting period
beginning on or after the first day of January in the calendar year next following that in
which such notice is given.
DONE at Bridgetown in duplicate, this 31st day of December, 1984.

FOR THE GOVERNMENT FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF
OF BARBADOS: THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:
(s) Louis R. Tull(s) Kenneth A. Kurze
NOTES OF EXCHANGE
The American Charge d’Affaires ad interim to the Barbadian Minister of Foreign Affairs
EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Bridgetown, Barbados
No.1001
December 31, 1984
The Honorable
Louis R. Tull, M.P.,
Minister of Foreign Affairs and Attorney-General
Barbados.
EXCELLENCY: I have the honor to refer to the Convention between the United States of America
and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect
to Taxes on Income, signed today. The following understandings were reached between the two
Governments:
(1) In the process of negotiating this Convention, the delegation of Barbados emphasized the
necessity of including in the Convention additional provisions which would create incentives to promote
the flow of United States investment to Barbados.
The United States Delegation is not able to accept such a provision at this time. I wish, however to
assure you that my Government realizes the importance your Government attaches to the increase of
United States investment in Barbados. Should circumstances change, our Government would be
prepared to reopen the discussions in order to reflect in this Convention provisions which would
minimize the conflicts between the United States tax system and the incentives offered by the
Government of Barbados to promote foreign investment in Barbados and which are consistent with the
income tax policies of the United States, including tax convention policies, with respect to other
developing countries.
(2) During the course of the negotiation of this Convention, the delegation of Barbados sought
agreement to include in the Convention a provision which would treat as charitable contributions for tax
purposes, gifts by a resident of one Contracting State to a charitable organization in the other.

The United States delegation cannot agree to such a provision at this time. I wish, however, to
assure you that my Government appreciates the potential benefits of such a provision to the cultural and
economic development of Barbados. If, in the future, United States policies in this regard should
change, and the provision by the United States of such benefits by treaty to United States persons
should become acceptable, the United States would be prepared to reopen discussions with a view to
incorporating into the Convention such a provision.
I have the honor to propose to you that the present Note and your reply thereto constitute the
agreement of our two Governments on these understandings.
Accept, Excellency, the assurances of my highest consideration.
Kenneth A. Kurze
Charge d’Affaires a.i.
The Barbadian Minister of Foreign Affairs to the American Charge d’Affaires ad interim
MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.
MARINE HOUSE.
BARBADOS
Date: December 31, 1984.
Mr. Kenneth A. Kurze
Charge d’Affaires a.i.
Embassy of the United States of America
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Building
Broad Street
BRIDGETOWN.
Sir,
I have the honour to refer to your Note of December 31, 1984, which reads as follows:
“EXCELLENCY: I have the honor to refer to the Convention between the United States of
America and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with
Respect to Taxes on Income, signed today. The following understandings were reached between the
two Governments:
(1) In the process of negotiating this Convention, the delegation of Barbados emphasized the
necessity of including in the Convention additional provisions which would create incentives to promote
the flow of United States investment to Barbados.

The United States Delegation is not able to accept such a provision at this time. I wish, however to
assure you that my Government realizes the importance your Government attaches to the increase of
United States investment in Barbados. Should circumstances change, our Government would be
prepared to reopen the discussions in order to reflect in this Convention provisions which would
minimize the conflicts between the United States tax system and the incentives offered by the
Government of Barbados to promote foreign investment in Barbados and which are consistent with the
income tax policies of the United States, including tax convention policies, with respect to other
developing countries.
(2) During the course of the negotiation of this Convention, the delegation of Barbados sought
agreement to include in the Convention a provision which would treat as charitable contributions for tax
purposes, gifts by a resident of one Contracting State to a charitable organization in the other.
The United States delegation cannot agree to such a provision at this time. I wish, however, to
assure you that my Government appreciates the potential benefits of such a provision to the cultural and
economic development of Barbados. If, in the future, United States policies in this regard should
change, and the provision by the United States of such benefits by treaty to United States persons
should become acceptable, the United States would be prepared to reopen discussions with a view to
incorporating into the Convention such a provision.
I have the honor to propose to you that the present Note and your reply thereto constitute the
agreement of our two Governments on these understandings.
Accept, Excellency, the assurances of my highest consideration.”
The Government of Barbados agrees with the contents of your Note above, which together with this
Note shall constitute an agreement between the Governments of Barbados and the United States of
America in this matter
Accept, Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration
LOUIS R. TULL
Minister of Foreign Affairs.
PROTOCOL
PROTOCOL AMENDING THE 1984 INCOME TAX CONVENTION WITH BARBADOS
MESSAGE
FROM
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING
THE PROTOCOL AMENDING THE CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA AND BARBADOS FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION
AND THE PREVENTION OF FISCAL EVASION WITH RESPECT TO TAXES ON INCOME
SIGNED ON DECEMBER 31, 1984, WHICH PROTOCOL WAS SIGNED AT WASHINGTON
ON DECEMBER 18, 1991
LETTER OF SUBMITTAL (PROTOCOL)
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, September 22,1992.
The PRESIDENT,
The White House.
I have the honor to submit to you, with a view to its transmission to the Senate for advice and
consent to ratification, the Protocol Amending the Convention Between the United States of America
and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect
to Taxes on Income signed on December 31, 1984, which Protocol was signed at Washington on
December 18, 1991.
In addition, I transmit herewith, for the information of the Senate, Understandings Regarding the
Scope of the Limitation on Benefits Article in the U.S.-Barbados Protocol. Although not submitted for
the advice and consent of the Senate to ratification, this document is relevant to the consideration of the
Protocol by the Senate.
The Protocol amends the 1984 income tax Convention with Barbados which has been in force since
February 28, 1986 to modify certain provisions of the Convention.
The most significant provisions of the Protocol reflect a basic alteration of Barbadian treaty policy.
The present Convention incorporates a typical developing country approach, based on the United
Nations Model Convention, which is to minimize revenue losses of the developing country partner, by
having very low activity thresholds for taxing permanent establishments and relatively high withholding
rates on interest and royalties.
The Protocol, reflecting Barbadian recognition that these policies can inhibit the flow of capital and
technology to Barbados, includes substantially reduced withholding taxes on interest and royalties, and

more restrictive limitations on the taxation by one country of the business profits earned by a resident of
the other.
The Protocol also contains provisions which deny treaty benefits with respect to dividends and
interest paid by certain United States investment companies. Although the present Convention does not
prohibit the application of the U.S. branch tax, which was enacted subsequent to the signature of the
1984 treaty, it does not provide rules for its application. The Protocol includes a new article providing
for the imposition of a branch tax both in the United States and Barbados.
Additionally, the Protocol replaces the anti-treaty-shopping rules of the 1984 treaty with a flexible
set of rules modeled on the recent United States-German tax treaty. The Protocol is accompanied by
Understandings Regarding the Scope of the Limitation on Benefits Article in the U.S.-Barbados
Protocol which provide guidance to taxpayers and to tax authorities on the proper interpretation of the
rules.
A technical memorandum explaining in detail the provisions of the Protocol is being prepared by the
Department of the Treasury and will be submitted to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.
The Department of the Treasury, with the cooperation of the Department of State, was primarily
responsible for the negotiation of the Protocol. It has the full approval of both Departments.
Respectfully submitted,
FRANK G. WISNER.
Attachments: As stated.
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL (PROTOCOL)
THE WHITE HOUSE, September 30, 1992.
To the Senate of the United States:
I transmit herewith for Senate advice and consent to ratification the Protocol Amending the
Convention Between the United States of America and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double
Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income signed on December
31, 1984, which protocol was signed at Washington on December 18, 1991. I also transmit for the
information of the Senate the Report of the Department of State.
In addition, I transmit herewith, for the information of the Senate, Understandings Regarding the
Scope of the Limitation on Benefits Article in the U.S.-Barbados Protocol. Although not submitted for
the advice and consent of the Senate to ratification, this document is relevant to the consideration of the
protocol by the Senate.

The protocol amends the 1984 income tax convention with Barbados, which has been in force since
February 28, 1986, to modify certain provisions of the convention.
I recommend that the Senate give early and favorable consideration to the protocol and give its
advice and consent to ratification.
GEORGE BUSH.
NOTES OF EXCHANGE (PROTOCOL)
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, December 18, 1991.
His Excellency
Sir WILLIAM DOUGLAS,
Ambassador of Barbados.
Excellency: I have the honor to refer to the Protocol signed today amending the Convention
between the United States of America and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the
Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with respect to Taxes on Income and inform you on behalf of the
Government of the United States of America of the following:
During the negotiations leading to the conclusion of the Protocol signed today, the negotiators
developed an agreed Memorandum of Understanding intended to give guidance both to taxpayers and
tax authorities of our two countries in interpreting Article 22 (Limitation on Benefits). The guidance
represents the current views of our two countries with respect to Article 22. Future developments,
including experience in administering the Convention as amended by the Protocol, and Article 22, may
lead the competent authorities to develop and publish further developments and understandings.
If this position meets the approval of the Government of Barbados, this Note and your Note in reply
thereto will indicate that our Governments share a common understanding of the role of the
Memorandum of Understanding relating to the Protocol.
Accept, Excellency, the expression of my highest consideration.
EUGENE J. MCALLISTER
(For the Acting Secretary of State).
EMBASSY OF BARBADOS
Washington, DC, December18, 1991.

Hon. JAMES BAKER III,
Secretary of State,
Department of State, Washington, D.C.
Excellency, I have the honour to refer to the Protocol signed today amending the Convention
between the United States of America and Barbados for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the
Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with respect to taxes on Income and to inform you on behalf of the
Government of Barbados of the following:
During the negotiations leading to the conclusion of the Protocol signed today, the negotiators
developed an agreed Memorandum of Understanding intended to give guidance both to taxpayers and
tax authorities of our two countries in interpreting Article 22 (Limitation on Benefits). The guidance
represents the current views of our two countries with respect to Article 22. Future developments,
including experience in administering the Convention as amended by the Protocol, and Article 22, may
lead the competent authorities to develop and publish further developments and understandings.
This position meets the approval of the Government of Barbados and this Note in reply indicates
that our Governments share a common understanding of the role of the Memorandum of Understanding
relating to the Protocol.
Accept, Excellency, the expression of my highest consideration.
Dr. RUDI WEBSTER,
Ambassador.
PROTOCOL AMENDING THE CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA AND BARBADOS FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION AND
THE PREVENTION OF FISCAL EVASION WITH RESPECT TO TAXES ON INCOME
SIGNED ON DECEMBER 31, 1984
The United States of America and Barbados, desiring to conclude a Protocol to amend the
Convention for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to
taxes on income signed on December 31, 1984, (hereinafter referred to as “the Convention”) have
agreed as follows:
ARTICLE I
1. Article 5 (Permanent Establishment) of the Convention shall be deleted and replaced by the
following:
“ARTICLE 5
Permanent Establishment

1. For the purposes of this Convention, the term “permanent establishment” means a fixed place of
business through which the business of an enterprise is wholly or partly carried on.
2. The term “permanent establishment” includes especially
a) a place of management;
b) a branch;
c) an office;
d) a factory;
e) a workshop; and
f) a mine, an oil or gas well, a quarry, or any other place of extraction of natural
resources.
3. A building site or construction or installation project, or an installation or drilling rig or ship used
for the exploration or exploitation of natural resources, constitutes a permanent establishment only if it
lasts more than 183 days in any 12-month period.
4. Notwithstanding the preceding provisions of this Article, the term “permanent establishment” shall
be deemed not to include:
a) the use of facilities solely for the purpose of storage, display, or delivery of goods or
merchandise belonging to the enterprise;
b) the maintenance of a stock of goods or merchandise belonging to the enterprise
solely for the purpose of storage, display, or delivery;
c) the maintenance of a stock of goods or merchandise belonging to the enterprise
solely for the purpose of processing by another enterprise;
d) the maintenance of a fixed place of business solely for the purpose of purchasing
goods or merchandise, or of collecting information, for the enterprise;
e) the maintenance of a fixed place of business solely for the purpose of carrying on, for
the enterprise, any other activity of a preparatory or auxiliary character;
f) the maintenance of a fixed place of business solely for any combination of the
activities mentioned in subparagraphs a) to e).
5. Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2, where a person – other than an agent of
an independent status to whom paragraph 6 applies – is acting on behalf of an enterprise and has and
habitually exercises in a Contracting State an authority to conclude contracts in the name of the
enterprise, that enterprise shall be deemed to have a permanent establishment in that State in respect of
any activities which that person undertakes for the enterprise, unless the activities of such person are
limited to those mentioned in paragraph 4 which, if exercised through a fixed place of business, would
not make this fixed place of business a permanent establishment under the provisions of that paragraph.
6. An enterprise shall not be deemed to have a permanent establishment in a Contracting State
merely because it carries on business in that State through a broker, general commission agent, or any

other agent of an independent status, provided that such persons are acting in the ordinary course of
their business.
7. The fact that a company which is a resident of a Contracting State controls or is controlled by a
company which is a resident of the other Contracting State, or which carries on business in that other
State (whether through a permanent establishment or otherwise), shall not of itself constitute either
company a permanent establishment of the other.”
ARTICLE II
Paragraph 1 of Article 7 (Business Profits) of the Convention shall be deleted and replaced by the
following:
“l. The business profits of an enterprise of a Contracting State shall be taxable only in that State
unless the enterprise carries on or has carried on business in the other Contracting State through a
permanent establishment situated therein. If the enterprise carries on or has carried on business as
aforesaid, the business profits of the enterprise may be taxed in the other State but only so much of them
as is attributable to that permanent establishment.”
ARTICLE III
1. The following shall be added to paragraph 2 of Article 10 (Dividends) of the Convention,
immediately preceding the last sentence of the paragraph:
“Subparagraph (a) shall not apply in the case of dividends paid by a United States Regulated
Investment Company or Real Estate Investment Trust. Subparagraph (b) shall apply in the case of
dividends paid by a Regulated Investment Company. In the case of dividends paid by a Real Estate
Investment Trust, subparagraph (b) shall apply if the beneficial owner of the dividends is an individual
holding a less than 10 percent interest in the Real Estate Investment Trust; otherwise the rate of tax
applicable under domestic law shall apply.”
2. The second sentence of paragraph 5 of Article 10 (Dividends) of the Convention shall be deleted
and replaced by the following:
“In addition, a company which is a resident of Barbados shall be exempt from United States
accumulated earnings tax if individuals (other than United States citizens) who are residents of Barbados
control directly or indirectly throughout the last half of the taxable year more than 50 percent of the
entire voting power or value of the company.”
3. Paragraph 6 of Article 10 (Dividends) shall be deleted and replaced by the following:
“6. Where a company that is a resident of a Contracting State derives profits or income from the
other Contracting State, that other State may not impose any tax on the dividends paid by the company,
except insofar as such dividends are paid to a resident of that other State or are attributable to a

permanent establishment or a regular base situated in that other State, even if the dividends paid consist
wholly or partly of profits or income arising in such other State.”
ARTICLE IV
In paragraph 1 of Article 11 (Interest) of the Convention, the phrase “12.5 percent” shall be
replaced by “5 percent”.
ARTICLE V
In paragraph 2 of Article 12 (Royalties) of the Convention, the phrase “12.5 percent” shall be
replaced by “5 percent”.
ARTICLE VI
A new Article 13A shall be added to the Convention as follows:
“ARTICLE 13A
Branch Tax (1) A company which is a resident of a Contracting State may be subject in the other Contracting
State to a tax in addition to the tax allowable under the other provisions of this Convention.
(2) Such tax may be imposed only on:
(a) in the case of the United States:
(i) the ”dividend equivalent amount” of the business profits of the company
which are effectively connected (or treated as effectively connected) with the conduct of
a trade or business in the United States and which are either attributable to a permanent
establishment in the United States or subject to tax in the United States under Article 6
(Income from Real Property) or Article 13 (Gains) of this Convention; and
(ii) the excess, if any, of interest deductible in the United States in computing the
profits of the company that are subject to tax in the United States and are either
attributable to a permanent establishment in the United States or subject to tax in the
United States under Article 6 (Income from Real Property) or Article 13 (Gains) of this
Convention over the interest paid by or from the permanent establishment or trade or
business in the United States; and
(b) in the case of Barbados:
(i) on amounts sufficient to provide that a branch in Barbados of a United States
company (or a company of the United States otherwise taxable on net income in

Barbados) is taxed in a manner comparable to a similarly situated Barbadian company
and its United States shareholder, and
(ii) on interest expenses which are deductible for computing the income
described in the preceding sub-subparagraph, and which are comparable to amounts
described in subparagraph (a)(ii) of this paragraph.
(3) The taxes described in paragraph (2) of this Article shall not be imposed at a rate exceeding:
(a) the rate specified in paragraph (2)(a) of Article 10 (Dividends) for the taxes
described in subparagraphs (a)(i) and (b)(i) of paragraph (2) of this Article; and
(b) the appropriate rate specified in paragraph (1) of Article 11 (Interest) for the taxes
described in subparagraphs (a)(ii) and (b)(ii) of paragraph (2) of this Article.”
ARTICLE VII
Article 22 (Limitation on Benefits) of the Convention shall be deleted and replaced by the following:
“ARTICLE 22
Limitation on Benefits 1. A person that is a resident of a Contracting State and derives income from the other Contracting
State shall be entitled, in that other Contracting State, to all the benefits of this Convention only if such
person is:
(a) an individual;
(b) a Contracting State or a political subdivision or local authority thereof;
(c) engaged in the active conduct of a trade or business in the first-mentioned
Contracting State (other than the business of making or managing investments, unless these
activities are banking or insurance activities carried on by a bank or insurance company), and
the income derived from the other Contracting State is derived in connection with, or is
incidental to, that trade or business;
(d) a company in whose principal class of shares there is substantial and regular trading
on a recognized stock exchange;
(e)(i) a person, more than 50 percent of the beneficial interest in which (or in the
case of a company, more than 50 percent of the number of shares of each class of
whose shares) is owned, directly or indirectly, by persons entitled to the benefits of this
Convention under subparagraphs (a), (b), (d), or (f) or who are citizens of the United
States; and
(ii) a person, more than 50 percent of the gross income of which is not used,
directly or indirectly, to meet liabilities (including liabilities for interest or royalties) to
persons not entitled to the benefits of this Convention under subparagraphs (a), (b), (d),
or (f) and who are not citizens of the United States; or
(f) an entity that is a not-for-profit organization and that, by virtue of that status, is
generally exempt from income taxation in its Contracting State of residence, provided that more

than half of the beneficiaries, members or participants, if any, in such organization are persons
that are entitled, under this Article, to the benefits of this Convention.
2. A person that is not entitled to the benefits of this Convention pursuant to the provisions of
paragraph 1 may, nevertheless, be granted the benefits of the Convention if the competent authority of
the State in which the income in question arises so determines.
3. For the purposes of paragraph 1, the term “recognized stock exchange” means:
(a) the NASDAQ System owned by the National Association of Securities Dealers,
Inc. and any stock exchange registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission as a
national securities exchange for purposes of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and
(b) any other stock exchange agreed upon by the competent authorities of the
Contracting States.
4. The competent authorities of the Contracting States shall consult together with a view to
developing a commonly agreed application of the provisions of this Article. The competent authorities
shall, in accordance with the provisions of Article 26 (Exchange of Information), exchange such
information as is necessary for carrying out the provisions of this Article and safeguarding, in cases
envisioned therein, the application of their domestic law.”
ARTICLE VIII
1. This Protocol shall be ratified and instruments of ratification shall be exchanged as soon as
possible.
2. The Protocol shall enter into force upon the exchange of instruments of ratification, and shall have
effect
(a) in respect of taxes imposed in accordance with Articles 10 (Dividends), 11
(Interest) and 12 (Royalties) for amounts paid or credited on or after the first day of the second
month next following the date on which this Protocol enters into force;
(b) in respect of other taxes, for taxable years beginning on or after the first day of
January next following the date on which the Protocol enters into force.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned, duly authorized thereto by their respective
Governments, have signed this Protocol.
Done at Washington, in duplicate, this 18th day of December, 1991.
FOR THE UNITED STATES FOR
OF AMERICA: BARBADOS:
(s) Eugene J. McAllister(s) Rudi V. Webster

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
UNDERSTANDINGS REGARDING THE SCOPE OF THE
LIMITATION ON BENEFITS ARTICLE
IN THE U.S.-BARBADOS PROTOCOL
A. BUSINESS CONNECTION Paragraph 1(c) of Article 22 (Limitation on Benefits) of the U.S.-Barbados Income Tax
Convention, as amended by the Protocol, provides that benefits will be granted with respect to income
derived in connection with or incidental to an active trade or business in the State in which the income
recipient resides. This provision is self-executing; unlike the provisions of paragraph 2, discussed in
section B, below, it does not require advance competent authority ruling or approval.
The following examples illustrate the intention of the negotiators with respect to the interpretation of
the provisions of paragraph 1(c). The examples are not intended to be exhaustive of the kinds of cases
which would fall within the scope of the paragraph. All of the examples are intended to be understood
reciprocally.
Paragraph 1(c) is relevant only in cases in which the entity claiming treaty benefits is not entitled to
benefits under either the ownership and base erosion tests of paragraph 1(e) or the public trading test of
paragraph 1(d).
EXAMPLE IFacts: A Barbadian resident company is owned by three persons, each resident in a
different third country. The company is engaged in an active international marketing
business in Barbados. It purchases goods in Asia and sells them throughout the Western
Hemisphere, including the United States. It has a trade or business in the United States
but no permanent establishment under Article 5 of the treaty. The Barbadian company is
engaged in the United States in selling the goods which it has purchased in Asia. The
active purchasing and selling business in Barbados of the Barbadian company is
substantial in relation to the activities of the company’s trade or business in the United
States. Is the Barbadian company, by virtue of Articles 5 and 7 of the treaty, exempt
from U.S. tax on its income effectively connected with its U.S. trade or business?
Analysis: Treaty benefits would be allowed, and the income would be exempt because the treaty
requirement that the U.S. income is ‘derived in connection with or is incidental to’ the
Barbadian active business is satisfied. This conclusion is based on two elements in the
fact pattern presented: (1) the income is connected with the active Barbadian business –
– in this example in the form of a “downstream” connection; and (2) the active

Barbadian business is substantial in relation to the business carried on in the United
States.
EXAMPLE IIFacts:The facts are the same as in
Example I except that while the income is derived by a Barbadian company of which
the U.S. trade or business is a part, the relevant business activity in Barbados (i.e., the
worldwide purchasing and selling activity) is carried on by a Barbadian subsidiary
company of the first company. The Barbadian subsidiary’s activities meet the business
relationship and substantiality tests of the business connection provision, as described in
the preceding example. Is the effectively connected U.S. income of the U.S. trade or
business exempt from U.S. tax under Articles 5 and 7 of the treaty?
Analysis: The income is exempt because the two Barbadian entities (i.e., the one deriving the
income and the one carrying on the substantial active business in Barbados) are related.
Benefits are not denied merely because the income is earned by one Barbadian
company and the relevant activity is carried on in Barbados by a related Barbadian
company.
The existence of a similar multiple company structure in the United States would not
affect the right of the Barbadian company receiving the income to treaty benefits. If, for
example, a Barbadian company owns a subsidiary in the United States which is, itself, a
holding company for the group’s U.S. activities, and those activities are connected with
the business activity of the parent or a related company in Barbados, dividends paid by
the U.S. holding company to the Barbadian parent holding company would be tested
for eligibility for benefits, in the same way as described above, ignoring the fact that the
activities are carried on by one entity and the income in respect of which benefits are
claimed is paid by another, related, entity.
EXAMPLE IIIFacts:A U.S. resident company is owned by three persons, each resident in a different
third country. The company is the worldwide headquarters and parent of an integrated
international business carried on through subsidiaries in many countries, including
Barbados. The company’s wholly owned U.S. and Barbadian subsidiaries manufacture,
in their countries of residence, different products, each of which are part of the group’s
product line. The Barbadian subsidiary has been capitalized with debt and equity. The
active manufacturing business of the U.S. subsidiary is substantial in relation to the
activities of the Barbadian subsidiary. The U.S. parent manages the worldwide group
and also performs research and development to improve the manufacture of the group’s

product line. Are the Barbadian subsidiary’s dividend and interest payments to its U.S.
parent eligible for treaty benefits in Barbados?
Analysis:Treaty benefits would be allowed because the treaty requirement that the Barbadian
income is “derived in connection with or is incidental to” the U.S. active business is
satisfied. This conclusion is based on two elements in the fact pattern presented: (1) the
income is connected with the U.S. active business because the Barbadian subsidiary
and the U.S. subsidiary each manufacture products which are part of the group’s
product line, the U.S. parent manages the worldwide group, and the parent performs
research and development that benefits both subsidiaries; and (2) the active U.S.
business is substantial in relation to the business of the Barbadian subsidiary.
EXAMPLE IVFacts:A third-country resident establishes a Barbadian company for the purpose of
acquiring a large U.S. manufacturing company. The sole business activity of the
Barbadian company (other than holding the stock of the U.S. company) is the operation
of a small retailing outlet in Barbados which sells products manufactured by the U.S.
company. Is the Barbadian company entitled to treaty benefits under paragraph 1(c)
with respect to dividends it receives from the U.S. manufacturer?
Analysis:The dividends would not be entitled to benefits. Although there is, arguably, a business
connection between the U.S. and the Barbadian businesses, the substantiality test
described in the preceding examples is not met.
EXAMPLE VFacts:U.S., French and Canadian companies create a joint venture in the form of a
partnership organized in the United States to manufacture a product in a developing
country. The joint venture owns a Barbadian sales company which pays dividends to
the joint venture. Are these dividends eligible for reduced Barbadian withholding under
the U.S.-Barbados treaty?
Analysis:Under Article 4, only the U.S. partner is a resident of the United States for purposes of
the treaty. The question arises under this treaty, therefore, only with respect to the U.S.
partner’s share of the dividends. If the U.S. partner meets the public trading or
ownership and base erosion tests of subparagraphs 1(d) or (e), it is entitled to benefits
without reference to paragraph 1(c). If not, the analysis of the previous examples would
be applied to determine eligibility for benefits under 1(c). The determination of
Barbadian treaty benefits available to the French and Canadian partners will be made

under Barbadian treaties with France and Canada, or, in the absence of such treaties,
under the provisions of Barbados law.
EXAMPLE VIFacts:A Barbadian company, a Jamaican company and a Trinidadian company create
a joint venture in the form of a Barbadian resident company in which they take equal
share holdings. The joint venture company engages in an active data processing business
in Barbados. Income derived from that business that is retained as working capital is
invested in U.S. Government securities and other U.S. debt instruments until needed for
use in the business. Is interest paid on these instruments eligible for U.S.-Barbados
treaty benefits?
Analysis:The interest would be eligible for treaty benefits. Interest income earned from short-term
investment of working capital is incidental to the business in Barbados of the Barbadian
joint venture company.
B. COMPETENT AUTHORITY DISCRETION UNDER PARAGRAPH 2 As indicated above, treaty benefits may be claimed by the taxpayer under the provisions of
paragraph 1 (ownership, base erosion, public trading and business connection) without reference to
competent authority. It is anticipated that in the vast majority of cases, eligibility for treaty benefits will
be determinable without resort to competent authorities. The tax authorities of the Contracting States
may, of course, in reviewing a case determine that the taxpayer has improperly interpreted the
provisions of paragraph 1, and that benefits should not have been granted. Furthermore, under
paragraph 2 the competent authority of the source State may determine that, notwithstanding failure to
qualify for benefits under paragraph 1, benefits should be granted.
It is assumed that, for purposes of implementing paragraph 2, taxpayers will be permitted to present
their cases to the competent authority for an advance determination based on the facts, and will not be
required to wait until the tax authorities of one of the Contracting States have determined that benefits
are denied. In these circumstances, it is also expected that if competent authority determines that
benefits are to be allowed, they will be allowed retroactively to the time of entry into force of the
relevant treaty provision or the establishment of the structure in question, whichever is later.
In making determinations under paragraph 2, it is understood that the competent authorities will take
into account all relevant facts and circumstances. The factual criteria which the competent authorities are
expected to take into account include the existence of a clear business purpose for the structure and
location of the income earning entity in question; the conduct of an active trade or business (as opposed
to a mere investment activity) by such entity; and a valid business nexus between that entity and the
activity giving rise to the income. The competent authorities will, furthermore, consider, for example,

whether and to what extent a substantial headquarters operation conducted in a Contracting State by
employees of a resident of that State contribute to such valid business nexus, and should not, therefore,
be treated merely as the ‘making or managing [of] investments’ within the meaning of paragraph 1(c) of
Article 22.
The discretionary authority granted to the competent authorities in paragraph 2 is particularly
important in view of, and should be exercised with particular cognizance of, the developments in, and
objectives of, international economic integration, such as that among the member countries of the
CARICOM and under the proposed North American Free Trade Agreement.
The following example illustrates the application of the principles described in Section B, above.
EXAMPLE VIIFacts:Barbadian, Jamaican and Antiguan companies, each of which is engaged
directly or through its affiliates in substantial active business operations in its country of
residence, decide to cooperate in the development and marketing of a new computer
spreadsheet program through a corporate joint venture with its statutory seat in
Barbados. The development and marketing aspects of the project are carried out by the
individual joint venturers. The joint venture company, which is staffed with a significant
number of managerial and financial personnel seconded by the joint venturers, acts as
the general headquarters for the joint venture, responsible for the overall management of
the project including coordination of the functions separately performed by the individual
joint venturers on behalf of the joint venture company, development of sales strategies,
and the investment of working capital contributed by the joint venturers and the
financing of the project’s additional capital requirements through public and private
borrowings. The joint venture company derives portfolio investment income from U.S.
sources generated by working capital investments. Is this income eligible for benefits
under the U.S.-Barbados treaty?
Analysis:If the joint venture company’s activities constitute an active business and the income is
connected to that business, benefits would be allowed under paragraph 1(c). If not, it is
expected that the U.S. competent authority would determine that treaty benefits should
be allowed in accordance with paragraph (2) under the facts presented, particularly in
view of (1) the clear business purpose for the formation and location of the joint venture
company; (2) the significant headquarters functions performed by that company in
addition to financial functions; and (3) the fact that all of the joint venturers are
companies resident in CARICOM member countries in which they are engaged directly
or through their affiliates in substantial active business operations.

The competent authorities will consult further on these issues and develop additional
standards for the application of the Article as they gain experience with the application
of these rules.

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