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Government of the Republic of Namibia Civic Organizations Partnership Policy

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REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA
GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA
CIVIC ORGANISATIONS
PARTNERSHIP POLICY
December 2005
Office of the President
NATIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION
Decision No. 26 th/06.12.05/002

A Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA
GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF NAMIBIA
CIVIC ORGANISATIONS
PARTNERSHIP POLICY
December 2005
Office of the President
NATIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

B Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy C Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
LIST OF ACRONYMS
ALAN Association of Local Authorities in Namibia
ARC Association of Regional Councils
CBO Community-Based Organisation
CO Civic Organisation
CCN Council of Churches in Namibia
CSO Civil Society Organisation
DED German Development Service
FED Farmersʼ Extension Development (Group)
GRN Government of the Republic of Namibia
JCC Joint Consultative Committee
MoU Memorandum of Understanding
NANGOF Namibia Non-Governmental Organisation Forum
NCCI Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry
NDP National Development Plan
NGO Non Governmental Organisation
NPC National Planning Commission
NPCS National Planning Commission Secretariat
NUNW National Union of Namibian Workers
PEAC Presidential Economic Advisory Committee
PPP Public Private Partnership
SWAPO South West African Peopleʼs Organisation
UN United Nations
VA Voluntary Association (under common law)
VSO Voluntary Services Overseas
WO Welfare Organisation
WBCG Walvis Bay Corridor Group

B Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy C Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD i
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY iii
1 INTRODUCTION 1
2 SITUATION ANALYSIS 2
2.1 HISTORY OF CIVIL SOCIETY IN NAMIBIA 2
2.2 CURRENT LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT 3
2.3 THE EMERGENCE OF PARTNERSHIP 4
3 PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING THE POLICY 6
3.1 DEFINING PARTNERS 6
3.1.1 Civil Society 6
3.1.2 Civic Participation 6
3.1.3 Civic Organisations 6
3.1.4 Non Governmental Organisations 7
3.1.5 Community Based Organisations 7
3.1.6 Government and Intermediary Organisations 8
3.2 CORE VALUES AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF PARTNERSHIP 9
4 OVERALL GOAL, OBJECTIVES, ANTICIPATED OUTCOMES AND STRATEGIES 10
4.1 OBJECTIVE 1: To create a greater commitment for civic participation through the
promotion and encouragement of active citizenship 10
4.1.1 Rationale 10
4.1.2 Anticipated Outcomes 11
4.1.3 Implementation Strategies 11
4.2 OBJECTIVE 2: To enhance the environment for civic participation and partnership 12
4.2.1 Rationale 12
4.2.2 Anticipated Outcomes 13
4.2.3 Implementation Strategies 13
4.3 OBJECTIVE 3: To bring government closer to the people and create partnership
opportunities that benefit government, civic organisation and civil society 14
4.3.1 Rationale 14
4.3.2 Anticipated Outcomes 14
4.3.3 Implementation Strategies 14
4.4 OBJECTIVE 4: To enhance the capacity of partners (government and civic
organisations) to enter into partnerships and jointly respond to development
challenges and opportunities in an efficient, effective and sustainable fashion 15
4.4.1 Rationale 15
4.4.2 Anticipated Outcomes 15
4.4.3 Implementation Strategies 16
5 INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK 18
5.1 INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW 18
5.2 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 18
5.2.1 Advisory Committee 18
5.2.2 National Planning Commission 18
5.2.3 Civic Organisations 19
5.2.4 Line Ministries 19
5.2.5 Regional Governments and Local Authorities 19
ANNEX: POLICY OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS OF ACHIEVEMENT
MATRICES 20

i Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
FOREWORD
In 1999, the Government of the Republic of Namibia (GRN) undertook a National
Capacity Building Assessment to determine the current status and availability of human,
material, and institutional resources for fulfilling the countryʼs national and socio-
economic development objectives. Within the context of civil society, the study observed
that the policy, legislative and institutional frameworks within which Non-Governmental
Organisations (NGOs) and other Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) operate are not
adequately defined. Moreover, Government and NGOs collaboration has been somewhat
ineffective, being limited to just a few organisations. This may be due to the lack of clear
guidelines on partnership, and because NGOs and civil society in general remain weak
and divided, and have seldom been able to present a common front on issues affecting
them.
Nevertheless, despite their current capacity constraints, NGOs, Community-Based
Organisations (CBOs) and other COs play a vital role in providing links to local
communities and increasing social capital through the interventions they sponsor. They
have undertaken commendable work since independence in funding and implementing
development programmes and projects in specific and cross-cutting sectors, at local,
regional, national and international levels. Thus, their valuable contribution to national
development is widely recognised.
Similarly, despite the absence of a clear policy framework for Civic Organisations-
Government partnership, considerable progress has been made in terms of collaboration,
especially at the sectoral level. Civic Organisations have participated in policy dialogues
and policy formulation, including discussions on the preparation of the national budget
and other fiscal policies. The Government also appreciates that partnership with COs
can augment its own limited resources by leveraging additional project proposals,
finances and competencies. In addition, partnership can help bring about synergy and co-
ordination among the various actors operating within an area or sector; create a broader
political, economic and social community, and help ensure peopleʼs participation in
national development. In short, partnership amongst development agencies is a major
determinant of the success of development interventions, and hence should receive firm
policy support.
In order to implement the national assessment recommendations and address the issues
mentioned above, the Government included the formulation of a Partnership Policy in
the five-year Second National Development Plan (NDP2). With financial support from
the Governments of France and the Federal Republic of Germany, GRN facilitated the
policy formulation process. An Advisory Committee consisting of the National Planning
Commission Secretariat (NPCS) and representatives of COs was established to ensure
the full participation of all stakeholders in the policy formulation process.
The overall goal of the policy framework is to create a working partnership for the entire
country, its citizens and their civic organizations, and for the Government. Thus, the policy
reflects those provisions of Vision 2030 that foresee COs working in close partnership
with Government, utilising their capacities fully in their advocacy for the people, and in
the promotion of national development.

ii Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy iii Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
It is clear that all the principles of the partnership policy cannot be realised under the
existing, registration and regulatory framework for COs. Thus, a major feature of the
policy is its call for the formulation of a new Bill, leading to the establishment of a
voluntary, parallel system of registration for those wishing to enter into partnership
with Government. The new system would not replace, but rather would complement
existing provisions for current legal forms of COs. The details of the proposed Act will be
developed in a highly participatory manner.
It is important to state that neither the policy nor the proposed Act intend to control the
activities of COs in Namibia. Rather, they seek to provide a comprehensive framework
to guide their operations and to harmonise their activities in order to complement the
developmental efforts of the Government. This will also allow effective co-ordination
of the services provided, more efficient targeting and optimal use of scarce resources,
especially by eliminating duplication of functions. Thus, pursuit of the policy will
contribute to a coherent approach towards the realization of national development
objectives.
Finally, I would like to thank all those who participated in the formulation of this policy. I
would also wish to acknowledge the financial support received from France and Germany
for consultancy inputs, and the assistance committed by the European Commission in
commencing its implementation.
Helmut K. Angula
Director General
National Planning Commission

ii Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy iii Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The introductory chapter reasons the rationale for partnership between the Government,
civil society and their organisations and puts partnership into a national development
context. The sector mission in the Second National Development Plan (NDP2) for civil
society is to create an enabling environment for civil society and its organisations to
operate more effectively and efficiently in mobilising, managing and utilising resources;
and to facilitate these organisations to play an active role in the social, political and
economic development of Namibia. In line with this mission, NDP2 recognises the
prominent role civic organisations (COs) play in the development of the country.
There are past and present factors that have shaped the situation of civil society in
Namibia. Naturally, these are closely intertwined, but the distinction between them helps
to respond to past influences within a contemporary setting. In Chapter 2, a situation
analysis provides the historical background of civil society and outlines the present
legal and regulatory environment. It also sheds light on past and present experiences of
partnership and shows that there is sufficient experience to support the formalisation of
partnership arrangements between the Government and COs.
Chapter 3 defines partners and partnership, together with its core values and principles.
The term ʻcivil societyʼ includes individuals, their voluntary organisations, the private
sector as a sector and their relationship with each other as well as with the Government.
Thus, civil society houses diversity and difference, which emerge as a result of freedom
of association. Unlike Government, civil society should not be seen as a uniform entity
which can be consulted or recruited for a specific purpose.
The Government and its agencies assume the responsibility to stay in close contact with
citizens, either directly or through civil society and its COs. In doing so, various governmental
bodies have different roles and functions with respect to consultation, co-operation and
collaboration. There is a need to establish clear principles of collaboration and partnership.
Partnership should clearly state the purpose of collaboration, aim at building mutual trust and
create an enabling environment for collaboration. This should be shared by all participating
groups and should contain achievable goals and objectives. Collaborating partners should
have the same vision. They should have a clearly agreed upon mission, with accompanying
objectives and strategies. Whilst the mission and goals of each of the collaborating partners
will be different, their collaborative goals and interests should be shared.
In Chapter 4, the policy core is outlined. The Government, in consultation with civil
society aims to create a ʻWorking Partnershipʼ – a partnership that works for the entire
country, its citizens and their civic organisations and for the Government.
The policy has four objectives:
∑ To create a greater commitment for civic participation through the promotion and
encouragement of active citizenship.
∑ To enhance the environment for civic participation and partnership.
∑ To bring the Government closer to the people and create partnership opportunities
that benefit the Government, COs and civil society.

iv Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 1 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
∑ To enhance the capacity of partners (the Government and COs) to enter into
partnerships and jointly respond to development challenges and opportunities in
an efficient, effective and sustainable fashion.
For each of these four objectives the anticipated goals, outcomes and indicators of
achievement are outlined.
In order to put the policy on a sound footing and promote its further development,
Chapter 5 describes practical implementation strategies for each policy objective. These
implementation strategies deal with the following:
∑ The promotion of, and support to, indigenous approaches of civic participation.
∑ The communication of local and international best practices.
∑ The planning and implementation of a national initiative campaign.
∑ Support to the International Day of the Volunteer.
∑ The creation of learning opportunities.
∑ The development of an improved legal and regulatory environment through the
formulation of a new Registration for Partnership Act.
∑ The development of the CO database.
∑ The formulation of a Code of Good Practice.
∑ Government synergy in the involvement of COs.
∑ Opportunities for civic involvement.
∑ The production and dissemination of a bi-annual partnership newsletter.
∑ Measuring the impact of partnership in development.
∑ Networks and linkages.
∑ Capacity building initiatives.
∑ The establishment of a Partnership Help Desk.
Chapter 6 deals with the organisational and institutional arrangements to foster and support
partnership. An Advisory Committee will be established under the National Planning
Commission (NPC) Act. Members of this committee will represent the Government and
COs from all sectors identified in the policy. The NPC shall review the present structure
of its Secretariat with regard to its responsibilities towards COs, identify gaps in line
with the policy recommendations and strengthen its capacity to promote and facilitate
partnership arrangements. Civic organisations have the opportunity to make use of the
services of NPCS. It is essential to note that these services are not in conflict with or take
over the functions of the Namibia Non-Governmntal Organisation Forum (NANGOF)
or other apex organisations. Such organisations will continue to act and advocate in the
interests of COs across CO sectoral lines.

iv Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 1 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
1 INTRODUCTION
The adoption of Namibia’s Constitution in 1990 was hailed around the world for its
enlightened approach to human rights and democratic freedoms. Namibia provides the
space for people to express their freedoms. These rights cannot be repealed or amended. All
other development priorities reflect and operate within these constitutional requirements.
Through ‘Vision 2030’, all stakeholders have sketched the road ahead for the country.
Whilst this vision should not change, scenarios may arise from internal or external forces
and factors, which may challenge the achievement of this vision. It will be essential that
the Government and civil society are prepared and ready to face such scenarios and make
strategic adjustments to policy implementation.
Short and medium term strategies are outlined in the National Development Plans (NDPs). The
sector mission in NDP2 for civil society is to create an enabling environment for civil society
and its organisations to operate more effectively and efficiently in mobilising, managing and
utilising resources; and to facilitate these organisations to play an active role in the social,
political and economic development of Namibia. In line with this mission, NDP2 recognises
the prominent role civic organisations play in the development of the country, thus creating the
need for the promotion and development of these organisations and calls for:
∑ A definition of the sector.
∑ A framework for collaborative, consultative and co-ordinated approaches to
issues of public interest between COs and the Government.
∑ A mechanism for the exchange and flow of information on development activities
for better co-ordination in order to minimise wastage of resources.
∑ Mechanisms to promote transparency, accountability, awareness and commitment
among civic organisations and their stakeholders.
∑ Criteria for evaluating the impact of civic organisations on development (e.g. HIV/
AIDS, employment, poverty reduction, environment, gender, democracy, good
governance, regional development, youth, people living with disabilities, etc.).
A number of specific reasons for pursuing partnership approaches have been identified:
∑ They provide a forum for consensus building and promote the development of a
strategic approach.
∑ They facilitate co-ordination in action realising benefits from avoiding overlap
and duplication.
∑ They extend the scope of action and facilitate integration across policy fields, and
sectoral and agency boundaries.
∑ They enhance impact and effectiveness through combined and more efficient use
of resources (e.g. co-ordination, integration and concentration on priorities).
∑ They allow and facilitate a ‘division of labour’, with each actor fulfilling his
comparative advantage.
∑ They enhance the outcomes of the work of individual partners/organisations.
∑ They promote innovation and provide broader perspectives.
∑ They promote more customer-orientation in the development and delivery of
public programmes (including improved targeting) and provide links to local
people and/or beneficiaries.
∑ They establish a greater sense of local identity, community and ownership,
leading to more inclusive, equitable and socially sustainable development.

2 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 3 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
2 SITUATION ANALYSIS
2.1 HISTORY OF CIVIL SOCIETY IN NAMIBIA
Before Independence, there was little opportunity for COsʼ involvement in Namibia. A number
of COs, such as the churches, trade unions, student movement, womenʼs organisations and
human rights organisations were active in providing mainly social protection and support in
the country whilst being highly critical of the colonial regime. Others, outside the liberation
movement were tolerated and at times used as ʻfrontsʼ by the colonial administration with no,
or very questionable legitimacy. However, it can be argued that the liberation struggle against
apartheid and colonialism in itself was a movement of civil society, which proved to be highly
effective and eventually contributed to the end of colonial occupation.
The establishment of democracy in Namibia had its watershed years in the period following
Independence in 1990. The first democratically elected Government realised the importance
of NGOs in the development and reconstruction of the country. There has accordingly been
a rapid growth in the number and size of NGOs and other civic organisations.
Development policy formulation, immediately after independence, was initiated and
driven by the Government. The civil society sector emerged fragmented and experienced
extremely low levels of capacity. However, the situation changed rapidly within the first
years of independence. Due to the establishment of democratic principles and practices
and freedom of association, Namibia became a favoured country of international donor
agencies, which were eager to support a fast growing civil society sector. This sector
started assuming policy lead roles and became increasingly available for partnership in
development. A key source of effectiveness was not only the ability to engage with other
interests, but also the capacity to form alliances and coalitions. Faith-based organisations,
community-based networks, community-based natural resource management networks,
womenʼ groups and national and regional coalitions of NGOs became key actors, as did
trade unions and business representative organisations.
There are past and present factors that have shaped the situation of civil society in
Namibia. Naturally, these are closely intertwined, but the distinctions between them help
to respond to past influences within a contemporary setting. Historical factors that have
influenced the current state of civil society in Namibia include:
∑ the legacy of colonisation and apartheid –– where many types of civic
organisations were banned by the South African Government, and where civic
actions were closely monitored, if allowed at all;
∑ the adoption of western models of civil society, rather than developing models
that are based on the search and adaptation of indigenous and African models of
civil society.
Contemporary factors that contribute to the state of civil society in Namibia include:
∑ the realisation that the Government cannot do it alone and that local and/or
sectoral association and organisation can lead to essential development gains.
∑ the disinterested attitudes that promote a tendency to leave everything to the
Government, rather than take an active role.

2 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 3 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
∑ the emergence of civic organisations that once were sympathetic to the governing
party, now having become critical of it.
∑ the limited avenues for participation in the market economy and the opportunity
to access donor funds have provided a potential career avenue for people to form
COs, who would otherwise be working in business.
∑ the growth in employment opportunities for many Namibians in both the public
and private sectors, leaving the non-government sector with a shallow human
resource base.
2.2 CURRENT LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT
Under the current legal and regulatory framework, COs have the option to be registered
and operate as:
∑ Voluntary Associations (VAs) (under common law) with very few regulatory
requirements. All such VAs have to be membership based, and this must be
reflected in their constitutions and by-laws.
∑ Trusts and Foundations (Trusts Moneys Protection Act No.34 of 1934) where
the trust deed is a more formal legal document, which is registered with the Master
of High Court. Trusts are never membership organisations, but are governed by a
Board of Trustees, appointed by the Trust.
∑ Section 21 of Companies Act, No: 28 of 2004 (Companies not for gain, not
having a share capital, as part of the Companies Act) where the most formal
legal document defines the rights and obligations of members, and more public
reporting about the management and finances of the organisation is required. It
should be noted that all VAs would in principle have the opportunity to establish
and register as a Section 21 of Companies Act, No: 28 of 2004.
∑ Welfare Organisations (Welfare Act No.12 of 1979) , granted by the Ministry
of Health and Social Services). This arrangement relates more to the special
recognition of an organisation as a welfare organisation in addition to being set
up under any of the three possibilities above.
∑ Registration and/or incorporation within the framework of Acts of Parliament,
official Government policy or Cabinet decision. Co-operatives, (under
Cooperative Act No. 23 of 1996), Trade Unions, Councils, such as the Sports
Council and Youth Council, School Boards are all examples.
The following observations can be made: Voluntary Association is a very loose
arrangement and compliance under common law has rarely been challenged. There is
hardly any control over the accountability and transparency of such organisations. Thus
they are sometimes labelled as ʻthe informal sector of civil societyʼ. The common law
to allow for association also turns a blind eye to the ʻinvisibleʼ or informal associations
that have sprung up. Among these are groups that legitimately or illegitimately and
routinely participate in policy processes. They include pressure groups, informal types
of associations in urban and rural areas, as well as the influence of the ʻnewʼ churches. In
many of these own rules of behaviour and solidarity networks have emerged to provide
them with some self-protection and inclusion. They often are very much aware of donor

4 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 5 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
programmes, but may themselves also remain invisible to donors. They include local
womenʼs projects, producersʼ associations or farmers clubs and village-based clubs, and
committees that operate as part of the extension services of line ministries.
In the case of Section 21 Companies, hardly any of them follow the prescribed
Memorandum of Association. Instead they attach their own individual constitutions in
place of such Memoranda often in contradiction with the Act. Section 21 Companies
often appear to be ʻhybridsʼ of membership based organisations (Associations) and Trusts
with very little clarity over the term ʻmemberʼ used in the Act.
The need to improve upon the current legislative and institutional framework within
which Civic Organisations operate is recognised in NDP2. Consequently, this policy
calls for the formulation of a New Bill , to establish a transparent, voluntary, parallel
registration process in order to complement existing provisions and to nurture the
principles of partnership.
2.3 THE EMERGENCE OF PARTNERSHIP
A range of Government bodies have taken the lead in delivering policies that promote
participation, including local and regional Government, independent local development
agencies and central Government operating locally targeted measures. The Government
immediately after independence, having recognised the important role that COs can play in
development, made provision for CO involvement in policy development and implementation.
Indeed the role of civil society is mentioned in virtually all Government policies. Government
recognises that development has to be bottom-up and must include the active participation of
citizens and their organisations, thus ʻdemocratising developmentʼ. However, in practice, CO
participation has, arguably, been rather minimal. Some of the multiple reasons for low levels
of involvement in policy and strategy implementation are listed below:
∑ COs are insufficiently aware of policy components and miss the opportunity to
actively participate both in the formulation of strategies and the implementation
of such strategies. The Government has not been sufficiently forthcoming in
creating awareness amongst COs about what participation (co-operation and
collaboration) opportunities exist, arguing that it is the role of COs to identify and
propose strategies for collaboration.
∑ Lack of a partnership policy framework. Formal recognition of COs and a degree
of institutionalisation of partnership are desirable in this regard.
∑ COs fear that their roles may be instrumentalised in the sense that they may
become part of the Government bureaucracy without being given the resources to
carry out their assigned functions.
Notwithstanding the fact that partnerships between COs and Government have been rather
limited to date, the concept is not new. Indeed, there are a number of positive experiences
of such partnerships, the most important of which are as follows:
∑ Formal and/or informal inclusion of the Government in CO structures to improve
policy implementation through better communication and joint activity planning.
An example is the JCC which has a Minister as its Patron.

4 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 5 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
∑ COsʼ participation on Fora, Boards, Committees and Commissions established by
the Government.
∑ A formal relationship regulated through Acts and/or Cabinet decisions – Trade
Unions, Council of Churches in Namibia (CCN), Co-operatives, sports
organisations, school boards, Farmers Extension Development (FED) groups,
etc.
∑ The Government has entered into co-operation with some COs delegating
functions and authorities to COs, to be carried out on behalf of and in conjunction
with the Government.
∑ Private-Public Partnerships (PPP) to undertake a project and/or provide services.
Partnerships occur often at local levels where local authorities share the
responsibility of providing services with NGOs. The Walvis Bay Corridor Group
(WBCG) is another PPP, where both private and public sector actors manage and
promote the transport corridor as a national asset.
Many sector/line Ministries have embarked on community participation in their policies
and strategies through planning, management and implementation of those activities.
Examples include health, education, natural resource management and housing and water
provision. However, this approach is relatively new in Namibia, and line Ministries and
civil society will need to develop the necessary skills for developing community capacity,
to identify and implement programmes and projects.
In the light of the above it can be argued that there is sufficient experience to support
the formalisation of partnership arrangements between the Government and COs and
ensure that such partnerships are beneficial to COs, the Government and the ultimate
beneficiaries.

6 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 7 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
3 PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING THE POLICY
3.1 DEFINING PARTNERS
3.1.1 Civil Society
The term civil society is complex and has been ascribed many different meanings. For
the purposes of this policy, civil society is deemed to encompass all public activity
by individuals, their voluntary organisations, the private sector as a sector and their
relationships with each other as well as with the Government. The term refers to all levels
within a country, from grass roots to national, and indeed beyond borders, as the concept
of a global civil society becomes stronger.
By definition, civil society houses diversity and difference. It emerges as a result of
freedom of association, which enables citizens to organise around interests or values.
If there were no freedom to associate, there would be no civil society. In a democracy,
freedom is not handed out selectively. Civil society, therefore, comprises groups,
networks, movements and interests sympathetic to national development goals and
objectives and others who may be hostile to it. Association of freedom includes the right
ʻnot to associateʼ. Therefore, unlike the Government, civil society should not be seen as a
uniform entity which can be consulted or recruited for a specific purpose.
3.1.2 Civic Participation
Civic participation refers to the engagement and/or involvement of individuals and of
civic organisations in the public life of Namibian society. Civic participation or action
also refers to the involvement of individuals in the activities of these organisations.
3.1.3 Civic Organisations
The term ʻcivic organisationsʼ refers to a wide range of organisations found at all levels of
civil society between the individual or family and the state, and which become involved
in activities that pursue the interests of their members, sponsors and/or beneficiaries.
These include NGOs, Community-Based Organisations (CBOs), various clubs (such
as service clubs and sporting clubs) and interest-groups (such as trusts, foundations,
womenʼs groups, trade unions, chambers of commerce, hawkersʼ organisations, and faith
organisations). Individual businesses, which are part of societyʼs economic structure, are
excluded from this definition.
It should be noted that the term ʻCivil Society Organisationʼ (or CSO) has not been used in
this policy document for the avoidance of ambiguity. Under NDP2, CSO was used to describe
networks and mass membership organisations, but not NGOs or CBOs. Under this policy, Civic
Organisations refers to ALL the organisations of civil society, including CBOs and NGOs.
Civic organisations have the following characteristics in common:
∑ They are non-profit distributing.
∑ They operate in the public interest or in the interest of their members and/or sponsors.
∑ They adhere to democratic structures.
∑ Involvement is voluntary.

6 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 7 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
∑ They portray high levels of participation.
∑ They emphasise empowerment of beneficiaries.
∑ They operate independently (both financially and administratively) from the state
and donors.
3.1.4 Non Governmental Organisations
As noted above, Civic Organisations include NGOs. Again this is a difficult term to define,
as such organisations vary widely in scope and character, depending on their philosophy,
size and sectoral expertise. They adhere to all the characteristics of COs mentioned
above, and whilst most have undergone a considerable degree of professionalisation over
recent years, altruism and volunteerism are still important features. In addition, in order
to match the criteria for recognition by the United Nations, NGOs should not constitute a
criminal group, or engage in violence.
NGOs operate at different levels. Some work country-wide, in which case they are usually
referred to as National NGOs, while others are trans-national, and may be described as
International NGOs. The latter types are usually based in developed countries, and operate
in several developing nations. For the purposes of this policy, the term NGO refers to both
levels, but with particular emphasis on national organisations.
Whilst some definitions of NGOs take a very broad stance and apply the term to any
not-for-profit organisation that is independent of government (including grass roots
organisations), this policy views NGOs as national development agencies. As such, they
usually operate in more than one local community, and in more than one field. Thus, they
are seen as intermediary organisations between local communities and other development
actors, such as Government, International Development Partners and the private sector.
They also have an independent board of directors or trustees.
NGOs in Namibia have been active in almost all the major development sectors, such as
education and training; agriculture and rural development; small and medium enterprises;
gender issues; health; housing; relief, and human rights and democracy. A growing number
of them have moved from operational, service delivery, to advocacy and capacity building.
3.1.5 Community Based Organisations
In contrast to NGOs, Community Based Organisations (CBOs), whilst also sharing
the characteristics of all COs mentioned above, are defined under this policy as those
organisations which operate at the very basic grassroots level. They tend to be locally
based, with a relatively small membership comprising a group of individuals who have
come together to safeguard or further their own, shared interests or to undertake self-
help projects. CBOs are often established with the assistance of NGOs. Whilst the latter
typically deliver goods and services, CBOs tend to be the recipients, although they often
also constitute the institutional framework through which beneficiary participation is
realised.
Although some CBOs can be quite well organised and formally constituted, most are
rather informal. For this reason, it is difficult to estimate their number in Namibia. Typical
examples include women and youth groups; housing associations; farmersʼ leagues;
savings and credit associations; water point committees and conservancies.

8 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 9 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
3.1.6 Government and Intermediary Organisations
The Government and its agencies assume the responsibility to stay in close contact with
citizens, either directly or through civil society and its civic organisations. In doing
so, various Governmental bodies have different roles and functions with respect to
consultation, co-operation and collaboration.
The Office of the President through the NPC plans and directs the course of development
and interacts closely with civil society. In addition, the office initiates fora, platforms
and commissions in which the opportunity exists to discuss and make recommendations
of national importance. The Presidential Economic Advisory Committee (PEAC),
Presidential Commissions, the drafting of ʻVision 2030ʼ and the ʻSmart Partnershipʼ
concept are examples.
The Parliament as the legislative arm of the Government consults citizens prior to the
promulgation of laws through Parliamentary Standing Committees, which arrange public
meetings and hearings. These Standing Committees also co-operate more regularly and
formally with segments of civil society such as the business community through NCCI.
Through the Parliamentʼs constituency outreach programme, lawmakers ensure that
regular consultations occur with citizens and take the opportunity to acquaint themselves
with local civil society activities.
Political parties are part of the political make-up of society and are therefore not civic
organisations. However, political parties take a keen interest in issues affecting their voters
and ensure that development agendas are embedded in their political manifestos. They
ensure that democracy stays alive. Political parties engage themselves in development and
civic activities such as the combating of social evils (violence and crime) and HIV/AIDS.
Through the wings of political parties (such as the Eldersʼ Council, Youth League, and
Women Councils), which very often function as civic organisations, important issues in
the areas of youth unemployment, education, gender and social safety nets are addressed.
Political parties in Namibia can also collaborate more formally with COs through formal
or informal affiliation. The most obvious case is the political affiliation of National Union
of Namibian Workers (NUNW) to the SWAPO party.
Ministries are responsible for drafting policies, which are adopted by the Cabinet. In
these policies the participation of civil society is stressed and partnership with civic
organisations recommended. Ministries are open to discuss and enter into partnerships
with COs in line with these policies and are in a position to build CO capacity to make
the partnership effective.
Government agencies such as the Electoral Commission, the Office of the Ombudsman,
Councils established by Acts of Parliament, the Social Security Commission, the
Women and Child Abuse Centres, law enforcement agencies, etc., all have a history of
collaborating with individual citizens, groups of citizens and civic organisations. Together
with civil society they ensure good governance, stability and social security.
Sub-national governments (Local Authorities and Regional Governments) have emerged
as very important partners of civic organisations. At local level many partnership
arrangements exist, such as in low cost housing (for example, with the Shack Dwellers
Federation), and with informal market operators, etc. Through the Governmentʼs

8 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 9 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
decentralisation policy and enabling act, partnership opportunities are likely to increase.
In terms of regional and local planning, the various development committees (Regional,
Local, Constituency, Settlement Development Coordination Committees) established
under the policy provide a platform for dialogue and joint action. All stakeholders should
be party to these committees.
Traditional authorities are not part of civil society as they exercise state authority, either
formally by virtue of statutes empowering them to do so or through informal means
which enable them to exercise state-like authority. However, traditional authorities play
an important role in rural civil society, particularly within an important African society
setting. They are also considered by political parties to be able to ʻdeliverʼ votes during
elections. In addition, they have significant legitimacy and play important roles in local
conflict resolution and in impeding and promoting development, for instance in their role
in community resource management.
3.2 CORE VALUES AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES OF PARTNERSHIP
The core values underlying partnership are mutual respect, trust and equality. Whilst
partnership arrangements will strive to create synergy in development efforts by
increasing collaboration between the state and civic organisations, they will at the same
time fully respect the independence of COs.
These core values underpin the guiding principles of collaboration and partnership.
Partnership should clearly state the purpose of collaboration, aim at building mutual
trust and create an enabling environment for collaboration. This should be shared by all
participating groups and should contain achievable goals and objectives. Collaborating
partners should have the same vision. They should have a clearly agreed upon mission,
with accompanying objectives and strategies. Whilst the mission and goals of each of the
collaborating partners will be different, their collaborative goals and interests should be
shared.
Communication between collaborative partners should be open and frequent. They
should interact often––updating one another, openly discussing issues and conveying
all necessary information to one another and to people outside the group. Informal and
formal communication links should be established. Channels of communication should
be clearly written for information flow. In addition, members should establish personal
connections––producing a better, more informed and cohesive group working towards
common ends.
All partnerships should ensure that:
∑ each actor has a recognised role and a clear idea of the benefits to them.
∑ representatives on the partnership structures are committed individuals with
significant authority and influence within their respective agencies.
∑ there are clear lines of communication between the partners and effective boards,
committee and forum structures.
∑ partnership structures stay flexible to accommodate change with changing
circumstances.

10 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 11 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
4 OVERALL GOAL, OBJECTIVES, ANTICIPATED
OUTCOMES AND STRATEGIES OF THE POLICY
The overall goal of the policy is for the Government, in consultation with civil society, to
create a ʻWorking Partnershipʼ, a partnership that works for the entire country, its citizens
and their civic organisations and for the Government.
This goal will be realised through the achievement of the following four objectives:
∑ To create a greater commitment for civic participation through the promotion and
encouragement of active citizenship.
∑ To enhance the environment for civic participation and partnership.
∑ To bring the Government closer to the people and create partnership opportunities
that benefit the Government, civic organisations and civil society.
∑ To enhance the capacity of partners (Government and civic organisations) to enter
into partnerships and jointly respond to development challenges and opportunities
in an efficient, effective and sustainable fashion.
The overall goal and objectives of the policy reflect the provisions of Vision 2030,
which call for civil society, its individuals, groups and organisations to cooperate with
Government and its agencies at local, regional and national levels in order to consolidate
democratic ideals and create synergy in development efforts so as to maximise the social
and economic benefits for the beneficiaries. Indeed, Vision 2030 sees the Partnership
policy as the means of ensuring that civic organisations are an integral part of policy and
decision making and implementation on issues affecting the nation.
The following sections outline the rationale behind each of these objectives, along with
their anticipated outcomes, and the strategies outlining the activities that stakeholders
will embark upon to implement the policy. (A summary matrix, which includes possible
indicators of achievement, is presented in the Annex).
4.1 OBJECTIVE 1
To create a greater commitment for civic participation through the promotion and
encouragement of active citizenship.
4.1.1 Rationale
There is a need to raise awareness for civic participation and enable citizens to play
an active role in issues that concern them and their communities. Involving people in
development builds community pride and promotes ownership and responsibility. It
can also mobilise resources that are within communities and promote a stronger social
cohesion. It teaches skills and creates learning experiences. Whilst strong emphasis
should be given to developing forms of civil society that are uniquely Namibian by the
way they respond to the social, cultural, and historical systems of Namibia and its many
local, ethnic and national characters, there is also much that can be learnt from other
countries, especially in the Southern African region.

10 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 11 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
4.1.2 Anticipated Outcomes
∑ Development partners promote and support indigenous approaches of civic
participation and organisation.
∑ Development partners learn from local and international best practices.
∑ Development partners adopt effective mechanisms to promote, recognise and
reward voluntary action and active citizenship.
∑ Local and international development partners network to achieve a high level of
exposure and transfer of knowledge for civic participation and voluntarism.
4.1.3 Implementation Strategies
i. Promote and support indigenous approaches to civic participation
Rather than relying on imported models of civic participation from the West, the civic
practices of African societies can be a source of information, inspiration and dialogue.
Far from being lost or forgotten, these practices can be revisited and discussed, with a
view to designing patterns of civic participation that are contemporary and relevant to the
Namibian context. This can be done by engaging traditional elders and village groupings
in discussions that draw from traditional practices that contribute to civil society.
A forum shall be provided for COs to discuss the critical issues that affect the role and
efficacy of civic participation. Civic organisations shall identify and communicate civic
activities that are indigenous or relevant to Namibia to the forum. NPC shall coordinate
the design, and facilitate the implementation, of a series of small pilot projects where local
communities, COs and the Government enter into partnership approaches that build upon
customary and traditional experience and test their applicability to broader civic activities.
ii. Communicate local and international best practices
NPC shall foster international linkages with organisations engaged in civil society
development to access information that can be circulated to interested Namibian
organisations. In addition, NPC shall identify critical factors that can enhance the role
and contribution of civic participation to public life. This could include drawing from the
experiences of existing civic organisations in Namibia and elsewhere, to determine the
factors that have contributed to their successes, frustration and disappointments, as well
as from the experiences of other organisations involved in the promotion of civil society,
such as international development agencies.
NPC together with COs shall also investigate the efforts of other countries and communities
in the Southern African region, which have sought to promote civic participation and shall
communicate local, indigenous and international best practices by publishing a bi-annual
partnership newsletter.

iii. Plan and implement a national initiative campaign
Together with NPC, COs shall promote individual and collective initiative. This shall
involve the creation of a better understanding of active citizenship and the role of civic
organisations. Voluntary activities provide the basis on which civic participation takes
place. Just as leaders are an essential prerequisite for the mobilisation and organisation

12 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 13 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
of civic organisations, so too are the everyday volunteers. Programmes have been
developed internationally to support those who may not be in leadership positions, but
who are actively involved in different kinds of community activities. These exemplify
how civic participation can be recognised, supported and encouraged. In this vein, NPC
shall promote a stronger partnership with the UN system in Namibia in the celebration
of the International Day of the Volunteer and use this opportunity to highlight voluntary
achievements throughout the country.
Other programmes shall be designed to encourage citizens from all walks-of-life to take
actions that improve the quality of their own life and that of their communities. This may
involve the promotion of role models, as well as training programmes and competitions
that nurture and support initiatives at home, at work, in the community or in clubs and
associations. This may also involve an extensive media campaign that highlights the
initiatives and civic actions of progressive individuals and organisations.
A ʻNational Initiative Campaign Task Forceʼ shall be established to plan and implement
the campaign. This may be done in close co-operation with a selected local NGO and an
international development partner.
iv. Create learning opportunities
Learning opportunities have to be within the range of local people and their organisations.
This can involve efforts to modify different elements of the climate by the use of appropriate
language, the development of civic leaders, and encouragement and reward practices so
that people are more aware of how they can contribute to democratic and development
outcomes.
Collaboration with international Volunteer Organisations will be encouraged to identify
effective ways to share and learn from their experiences. A task force that works out
mechanisms for placement and exchange programmes, where local volunteers can learn
from local and international experiences, will also be established.
4.2 OBJECTIVE 2
To enhance the environment for civic participation and partnership.
4.2.1 Rationale
Lack of mandate or legitimacy has sometimes led to misunderstanding between
development partners and the client groups for whom the initiatives were intended.
Civic organisations and Government agencies can easily stand accused of undertaking
development projects in their own interest, such as securing funding for staff,
infrastructure and equipment with little of the resources coming the way of the intended
beneficiaries. Insufficient legitimacy on the side of COs has often been cited as a reason
for poor participation and reluctance to enter into partnerships. Thus, GRN wishes to
facilitate the creation of a more enabling environment for partnership to flourish.

12 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 13 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
4.2.2 Anticipated Outcomes
∑ Citizens have high levels of trust in civic participation through their respective
COs and are prepared to invest voluntary time, skills and leadership.
∑ Voluntary registration on the ʻCivic Organisation data baseʼ of NPC provides
enhanced recognition of civic organisations and establishes a sound foundation
for development partnership.
∑ A review of the existing legal and regulatory environment for civic organisations,
leads to the formulation of a new Bill to provide a parallel, complementary
voluntary registration system for partnership.
∑ Voluntary registration for partnership will enhance the credibility of COs, leading
to increased access to funds and opportunities.
∑ Mutually agreed upon instruments and principles of operation create high levels
of synergy for development programmes.
4.2.3 Implementation Strategies
i. Voluntary registration of COs on the database
Initially, after consultation with COs, NPC shall adopt basic minimum requirements for
registration of COs on the database under the existing legal and regulatory environment.
Registration will require at the least information regarding:
∑ The constitution of the organisation.
∑ A membership list, or a list of its sponsors (board of directors/trustees).
∑ The last financial and annual report.
∑ An organisational structure.
∑ Staffing.
∑ Services provided.
∑ An indication of partnership potential.
NPC shall further develop and maintain the existing database and encourage civic
organisations to register as service providers or potential partners on this database. The
minimum requirements shall be reflected by the entries on the database. The database will
be updated on a regular basis and its structure will be amended as necessary following the
enactment of the new Act and the establishment of a formal partnership registration system.
ii. Legal and regulatory environment for CO registration/incorporation
A study into the current legal and regulatory framework governing the operations of COs
shall be undertaken. This review will seek to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the
various actors in partnership arrangements for national development. Thus, it will help
reduce confusion and eliminate undue competition and overlapping mandates. The study
will ultimately result in the formulation of a new Bill to address current deficiencies. The
new Bill will not replace existing legal forms of COs or the current provisions which
regulate their operations. Rather, it will provide a complementary system operating in
parallel, and which will provide clear advantages to those organisations that do voluntarily
choose to register. The review and the new Bill formulation process will be undertaken in
a highly participatory manner involving the representatives of all stakeholders, and in the
spirit of the Partnership policy.

14 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 15 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
iii. Code of Good Practice
The Government and COs shall adopt a Code of Good Practice for partnership to
encourage transparency, accountability, awareness and commitment among partners. This
Code should at least include the following elements:
∑ the use of formal partnership arrangements (such as Memoranda of Understanding
or other contractual arrangements);
∑ a declaration of existing resources and identification of their sources;
∑ planning and communication mechanisms;
∑ reporting mechanisms (reports shall have narrative and financial components).
4.3 OBJECTIVE 3
To bring the Government closer to the people and create partnership opportunities that
benefit the Government, civic organisations and the civil society.
4.3.1 Rationale
Partnerships between different levels of Government (local, regional and national) and
various segments of society afford access to each actorʼs unique comparative advantages.
Partnership can enhance the Governmentʼs initiatives, broaden perspectives and raise
awareness, thereby creating an environment conducive to more inclusive, equitable and
socially sustainable development, especially at grass-root levels.
4.3.2 Anticipated Outcomes
∑ Government programmes reach the intended target beneficiaries and are
sustainable
∑ Partnership opportunities between the Government (local authorities, regional
governments, national level line and central ministries) and COs are identified
and effectively communicated.
∑ Civic organisations recognise the value of partnership and compete for
involvement in Government development programmes.
∑ Government actors, civic organisations and target beneficiaries are informed
about the value of partnership.
∑ Development partners are able to measure the impact of partnership programmes
and communicate the outcome.
4.3.3 Implementation Strategies
i. Government synergy in the involvement of COs
NPC shall adopt a mechanism for the exchange and flow of information on development
activities for better co-ordination in order to minimise wastage of resources. This shall
include regular fora for dialogue between COs and line Ministries and the dissemination of
draft policies and bills, which highlights and calls for involvement of civil society actors.

14 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 15 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
ii. Opportunities for civic involvement
All line Ministries, through the facilitation of NPC, shall identify and communicate
opportunities for civic organisations on an ongoing basis. NPC shall design and
disseminate a regular development partnership tender bulletin, which calls for submission
of interest from civil society to participate in joint development activities.
iii. Produce and disseminate a periodic partnership newsletter
Developing a history of collaboration or co-operation can create an environment for
collaboration. Such a history offers potential participants or partners an understanding of roles
and expectations under collaboration and enables them to trust the process. NPC shall produce
a periodic partnership newsletter, which (among other issues) will provide information on:
∑ best practices for partnership with concrete examples that can be replicated.
∑ models and examples of partnership programmes in other countries.
∑ updates on partnership opportunities.
∑ benefits of partnership (voices of beneficiaries).
iv. Measure the impact of partnership in development
It is important to measure the impact of the development initiatives of both civic
organisations and the Government and to clearly understand how the initiatives have
positively (or negatively) affected the livelihoods of people. Partners shall measure the
impact and contribution that partnership driven development has made within the context
of the National Development Plans. An impact monitoring system will be devised with
appropriate impact indicators.
4.4 OBJECTIVE 4
To enhance the capacity of partners (Government and civic organisations) to enter into
partnerships and jointly respond to development challenges and opportunities in an
efficient, effective and sustainable fashion
4.4.1 Rationale
Some of the major challenges facing COs include the need to develop and maintain their
human resources, to develop and adapt their organisational structures and strategically
plan and adapt their vision and policies in an ever changing environment .
4.4.2 Anticipated Outcomes
∑ Horizontal and vertical linkages between development partners achieve high
levels of synergy and avoid overlap and duplication.
∑ Development resources are shared to enhance the capacity of both civic and
public organisations and to create financial and technical sustainability.
∑ Development partners have access to a range of instruments that assist them with
entering into effective and efficient partnership arrangements.

16 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 17 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
4.4.3 Implementation Strategies
i. Networks and linkages
There is a growing recognition of the need to embed organisations in networks. This is
viewed more in terms of service delivery (in the sense that if one organisation cannot
provide a certain service, then another in its network may be able to). However, there
should be a broader purpose of establishing substantial legitimacy. Partnerships, both
horizontal amongst civic organisations and vertical with the Government, provide an
important opportunity to build capacity and sustainability.
Partnership can create synergy in development efforts, with both partners – Government
and COs – playing their distinctive roles. Such partnership will avoid overlap and
duplication and ensure that scarce resources are spent to achieve the maximum benefit for
the beneficiaries.
The NPC shall encourage and facilitate networks and linkages between civic organisations
and Government in identified development sectors. This will help overcome isolation and
enhance opportunities for sharing resources, ideas and concerns. Such partnerships may
include the participation of Government and COs on each otherʼs governance and/or
programme implementation structures, or the creation of joint programme implementation
mechanisms (such as Public Private Partnerships).
ii. Capacity building
The staff of nearly all civic organisations need training so as to build skills in areas such
as organisational development, management, project identification and preparation,
research, monitoring and evaluation, and networking, lobbying and advocacy. COs are
losing skilled managerial and professional staff to the public and private sectors at an
alarming rate due to strong competition in terms of the remuneration packages offered by
these sectors. Capacity building programmes are especially valuable for groups that are
often disadvantaged or excluded from many civic activities.
Financial sustainability is one of the key issues facing COs in Namibia. Although not
always under pressure from donors, the leadership and staff of COs feel the need to be
more financially sustainable to ensure the continuation of their organisations and the
services that they render. Experience has shown that international development partners
may change their interests and focus, thus placing COs in serious dilemmas if no provision
is made for long-term sustainability. Also, presently there is a decline in traditional
sources of external funding to Namibia. This is forcing COs to look at alternative sources
of income to continue their work. They are also realising that there is a need to make the
environment more conducive for their continued operation.
NPC shall assist in mobilising support to establish sustainable mechanisms to assist
COs and strengthen their institutional capacity building. NPC shall provide an interface
between COs and international development partners for the accessing of donor funds in
the context of partnership arrangements and shall provide access to international networks
for the implementation of agreed partnerships.

16 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 17 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
iii. Partnership Support Services
Development policies should aim to put in place a genuine partnership between public
agencies and social actors. It should nonetheless be recognised that there is no one model
of partnership. Different models will be appropriate in different conditions, depending on
the characteristics of the problems, institutional environment, political factors, experience
and culture.
NPC shall facilitate harmonious relationships amongst collaborating partners. It shall
design model constitutions for COs, and model agreements for partnership, such
as Memoranda of Understanding between collaborating partners (Government and
COs), clearly outlining the purpose of partnership, anticipated outcomes, planning and
implementation, use of shared resources and means of communication. NPC will also
provide general advice to COs that wish to enter into partnerships. This will include the
provision of information, brokerage services and the dissemination of model documents.
In order to provide such services, a ʻpartnership help deskʼ shall be established within
NPCS.

18 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 19 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
5 INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK
5.1 INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW
The institutional framework for the implementation of this policy will be considered under
the review outlined in section 4.2.3. Issues to be studied will include the role of individual
line ministries in the new, parallel registration process; the extent to which the registration
of local organisations can be decentralised to the Regional Authorities; and the extent to
which certain aspects of the new system can be delegated to civic organisations themselves
through voluntary codes, and self-regulation under a representative body. However, until the
enactment of the new legislation, the institutional framework outlined below will stand.
5.2 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
5.2.1 Advisory Committee
An Advisory Committee will be established under section 8 of the National Planning
Commission Act, 1994 (Act 15 of 1994). Members of this committee will represent all
levels of Government and COs. The advisory committee will meet on a quarterly basis to
advise NPC on the implementation of the GRN – CO Partnership Policy.
At quarterly meetings the committee shall propose and review policy implementation
matters. In between committee meetings, the NPCS in co-operation with members from
COs may establish task forces to work on any particular technical issue recommended
by the committee to be tabled at the next committee meeting. In particular the committee
shall perform the following tasks:
∑ Oversee the review of the legal and regulatory environment and advise on the
formulation of the new Bill for Partnership required for the purpose of improving
the environment in line with policy recommendations.
∑ Assist NPC to put in place the mechanisms and instruments that are needed to
fulfil its facilitatory role. In addition to the provision of technical advice to the
Partnership Help Desk, the Committeeʼs support will also include the constitution
of the CO forum for discussing critical partnership issues; the establishment of the
National Initiative Campaign Task Force, and the setting up of a Working Group
to develop the required M&E system.
∑ Bring to the attention of NPC any obstacle that may have hampered the
implementation of the policy and to propose measures to rectify such situations.
∑ Advise on strategies for the implementation of the policy and monitor and
evaluate the outcomes.
∑ Advise NPC on the promotion of the policy.
5.2.2 National Planning Commission
NPC shall review the present structure of its Secretariat with regard to its responsibilities
towards COs, identify gaps in line with the policy recommendations and undertake the
required capacity improvements. These will include:
∑ Maintaining and developing the CO partnership database
∑ Providing ongoing information on partnership opportunities

18 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 19 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
∑ Facilitating partnership arrangements and enhancing lines of communication
amongst Government, COs, international donors and the private sector
∑ Providing advisory sevices to both the Government and COs
∑ Coordinating the impact assessment of activities implemented under development
partnerships and collating information from various line Ministries and networks
∑ Facilitating access to finance and funding
∑ Building capacity in GRN – CO partnership programmes
∑ Providing information on GRN – CO partnerships to stakeholders (for example
through the production of an annual CO-GRN Development Partnership Report
and periodic Partnership Newsletter).
∑ Ensuring that the policy is implemented in harmony with other GRN policies and
in pursuit of the provisions of Vision 2030 with respect to civil society and its
partnership with all levels of Government.
5.2.3 Civic Organisations
Civic organisations have the opportunity to make use of the services of NPCS. It is
essential to note that these services are not in conflict with or take over the functions of
existing apex bodies. Such organisations will continue to act and advocate the interests
of COs across CO sectoral lines. They will work closely with NPCS both directly and
through the Advisory Committee and will actively participate in the proposed review and
formulation of the new Act.
5.2.4 Line Ministries
In addition to participating in the Advisory Committee, each line ministry in sectors in
which COs tend to be active will designate a Contact Officer to handle relations with COs
operating in their fields and to liaise with NPCS.
5.2.5 Regional Governments and Local Authorities
Sub-national units of Government will be represented on the Advisory Committee by a
nominee from the Association of Regional Councils or the Association of Local Authorities
in Namibia. In addition, each Regional Council will designate a Contact Officer to handle
relations with COs operating in their jurisdictions and to liaise with NPCS.

20 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 21 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
ANNEX
POLICY OBJECTIVES, OUTCOMES AND INDICATORS OF ACHIEVEMENT
MATRICES
The table below outlines the salient aspects of the policy, including its expected outcomes.
A column listing possible Indicators of Achievement has also been added. These
indicators and their associated targets will be developed further through the Advisory
Committee, and will form the basis for ongoing monitoring and later evaluation of the
policyʼs implementation progress and impact. Those suggested below are incomplete and
merely for guidance purposes.
OBJECTIVE 1
To create a greater commitment for civic participation through the promotion and
encouragement of active citizenship
Anticipated Outcomes Indicators of Achievement
Development partners promote and support indigenous
approaches of civic participation and organisation
Number, type and value of indigenous approaches
supported
Development partners learn from local and international
best practices
Number, type and value of international practices
documented and communicated
Development partners adopt effective mechanisms to
promote, recognise and reward voluntary action and
active citizenship
Outcome of the initiative campaign
Local and international development partners network
to achieve a high level of exposure and transfer of
knowledge for civic participation and voluntarism
Number of exposure opportunities and placements
OBJECTIVE 2
To enhance the environment for civic participation and partnership
Anticipated Outcomes Indicators of Achievement
Citizens have high levels of trust in civic participation
through their respective civic organisations and are
prepared to invest voluntary time, skills and leadership
Increasing membership of COs
Voluntary registration on the ‘Civic organisation data
base’ of NPC provides enhanced recognition of civic
organisations and establishes a sound foundation for
development partnership
Number of COs utilising the opportunity for voluntary
registration
A review of the existing legislative and regulatory
environment for civic organisations, leads to the
formulation of a new Registration for Partnership Act. This
in turn will increase the credibility and legitimacy of COs.
New Act and establishment of a voluntary, parallel
system for existing legal forms of COs to register for
partnership.
Registration on the complementary partnership
registration system allows COs to attract more funds
from donors
Increased levels of activity of COs
Mutually agreed upon instruments and principles of
operation create high levels of synergy for development
programmes
Mutually adopted Code of Practice and level of
adherence

20 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy 21 Government of the Republic of Namibia – Civic Organisations Partnership Policy
OBJECTIVE 3
To bring the Government closer to the people and create partnership opportunities
that benefit government, civic organisation and civil society
Anticipated Outcomes Indicators of Achievement
Government programmes reach the intended target
beneficiaries and are sustainable
Level of satisfaction expressed during Beneficiary
Assessment exercises.
Degree to which individual programmes meet their
specific objectives
Partnership opportunities between Government (local
and regional authorities and national level line and
central ministries) and civic organisations are identified
and effectively communicated
Number of opportunities identified and communicated
Civic organisations recognise the value of partnership
and compete for the involvement in government
development programmes
Number of tenders and level of response
Government actors, civic organisations and target
beneficiaries are informed about the value of partnership
Frequency of partnership newsletter, quality and
contributions from civil society
Development partners are able to measure the impact of
partnership programmes and communicate the outcome
Impact monitoring system and implementation
OBJECTIVE 4
To enhance the capacity of partners (Government and civic organisations) to enter
into partnerships and jointly respond to development challenges and opportunities in
an efficient, effective and sustainable fashion
Anticipated Outcomes Indicators of Achievement
Horizontal and vertical linkages between development
partners achieve high levels of synergy and avoid
overlap and duplication
Networks created and level of leadership participation
Development resources are shared to enhance the
capacity of both civic and public organisations and to
create financial and technical sustainability
Level of growth and sustainability of COs
Development partners have access to a range of
instruments that assist them with entering into effective
and efficient partnership arrangements
Level of utilisation of help desk and quality of
instruments

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