US Protest Law Tracker

The US Protest Law Tracker follows state and federal legislation introduced since January 2017 that restricts the right to peaceful assembly. For more information, visit our Analysis of US Anti-Protest Bills page.

45 states have
considered
305 bills
49 enacted 20 pending

No initiatives
Pending, defeated or expired initiatives
Enacted initiatives

Legislation

Latest updates: Jul. 5, 2024 (US Federal), Jul. 3, 2024 (Pennsylvania), Jul. 2, 2024 (Pennsylvania, US Federal)
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2 entries matching in provided filters in 0 states and 1 federal. Clear all filters
US Federal

HR 8883: Potential penalties for universities based on protest policies

Would make federal accreditation of colleges and universities—and thus their access to federal funds—contingent on the institution’s policies on responding to protests. Under the “No Tax Dollars for College Encampments Act of 2024,” universities would have to regularly disclose how they respond to campus “incidents of civil disturbance,” defined to include “a demonstration, riot, or strike,” and their accreditation would be linked to such policies and practices. The bill sponsor cited encampments and other campus demonstrations by protesters for Palestinian human rights as motivation for the bill.

(See full text of bill here)

Status: pending

Introduced 28 Jun 2024.

Issue(s): Campus Protests, Riot, Limit on Public Benefits

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US Federal

HR 8823: Withholding federal funds from states that do not punish street protesters

Would enable the federal government to withhold highway funding from states that allow protests on highways and other public roads. The bill would direct the Secretary of Transportation to withhold 10 percent of a state’s allocated federal highway funds each year, unless the Secretary could certify that the state had made “reasonable efforts” to prohibit individuals from “knowingly and recklessly obstructing” transportation on Federal-aid highways, which make up roughly one-quarter of all public roads in the U.S. Under the bill, the Secretary would have sole and unbounded discretion to make such a certification. The bill sponsor indicated that the bill is “a direct response to the increasing trend of unlawful traffic-obstructing protests.”

(See full text of bill here)

Status: pending

Introduced 25 Jun 2024.

Issue(s): Traffic Interference, Limit on Public Benefits

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For more information about the Tracker, contact Elly Page at EPage@icnl.org.